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Mark Oltermann, MD

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NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=(oltermann[Author]) AND (John Peter Smith[Affiliation] OR JPS Health Network[Affiliation] OR JPS [Affiliation] OR University of North Texas Health Science Center [Affiliation] NOT Japan Pancreas Society[Affiliation])
Updated: 13 hours 33 min ago

The coming "sepsis boom..." and the available but underutilized diagnostic tools that could avert it.

Wed, 01/30/2019 - 08:29
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The coming "sepsis boom..." and the available but underutilized diagnostic tools that could avert it.

MLO Med Lab Obs. 2012 Feb;44(2):36-7

Authors: Oltermann MH

PMID: 22452167 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Tracheal obstruction as a complication of tracheostomy tube malfunction: case report and review of the literature.

Wed, 01/30/2019 - 08:29
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Tracheal obstruction as a complication of tracheostomy tube malfunction: case report and review of the literature.

J Bronchology Interv Pulmonol. 2010 Jul;17(3):253-7

Authors: Lois M, Oltermann M

Abstract
Tracheostomy is a procedure frequently used in the intensive care unit for prolonged ventilatory support, long-term airway maintenance, and to prevent the complications of long-term translaryngeal intubation. It is believed that it eases patient care and improves the process of weaning from mechanical ventilation. The timing of tracheostomy is controversial and most physicians prefer translaryngeal intubation for needs of up to 10 days and a tracheostomy if an artificial airway for more than 21 days is anticipated. Tracheostomy can be associated with numerous acute (perioperative or postoperative) complications. Some of these complications continue to be a problem after the placement of the tracheostomy tube, and there are specific late complications that have clinical relevance. To our knowledge, there has been no description of a malfunctioning tracheostomy tube leading directly to complications and we are reporting the first case.

PMID: 23168895 [PubMed]

Nutrition support in the acutely ventilated patient.

Wed, 01/30/2019 - 08:29
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Nutrition support in the acutely ventilated patient.

Respir Care Clin N Am. 2006 Dec;12(4):533-45

Authors: Oltermann MH

Abstract
Although the nutrition support literature is limited and therefore does not provide robust evidence to promote grade A or strong recommendations, there is a "signal" from all of these studies taken a a whole that critically ill patients may benefit from nutritional manipulation. The acutely ventilated patient that is likely to still be intubated by day three is a classic example of the critically ill patient who has the potential to achieve positive outcomes with nutritional support. Initiating nutrition support early improves the chances of benefit. However, nutrition cannot be provided in a vacuum. It is only one part of a multitude of treatments and therapies that must be optimally applied by a multidisciplinary team of professionals dedicated to the care of ICU patients. The exact makeup of the enteral (or parenteral) formula that is most likely to improve survival is unclear. More research is needed. Further study may demonstrate the possibility for nutritional manipulation to be one of the most important treatments physicians can offer to critically ill ventilated patients. Nutrition may have as much survival benefit as activated protein C, a drug costing over $7000 per course of therapy. No longer can it be said that nutrition makes no difference.

PMID: 17150430 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]