Search this website

Katherine Buck, PhD

Subscribe to Katherine Buck, PhD feed Katherine Buck, PhD
NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=(Buck K[Author]) AND (John Peter Smith[Affiliation] OR JPS Health Network[Affiliation] OR JPS [Affiliation] NOT Japan Pancreas Society[Affiliation])
Updated: 14 hours 10 min ago

Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Postpartum Depression.

14 hours 10 min ago
Related Articles

Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Postpartum Depression.

Am Fam Physician. 2019 Aug 15;100(4):244-245

Authors: Buck K, Zekri S, Nguyen L, Ogar UJ

PMID: 31414780 [PubMed - in process]

Making Sense of Family Medicine Resident Wellness Curricula: A Delphi Study of Content Experts.

Thu, 07/04/2019 - 21:47
Related Articles

Making Sense of Family Medicine Resident Wellness Curricula: A Delphi Study of Content Experts.

Fam Med. 2019 Jul 02;:

Authors: Penwell-Waines L, Runyan C, Kolobova I, Grace A, Brennan J, Buck K, Ross V, Schneiderhan J

Abstract
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The Association of Family Medicine Residency Directors (AFMRD) Physician Wellness Task Force released a comprehensive Well-Being Action Plan as a guide to help programs create a culture of wellness. The plan, however, does not offer a recommendation as to which elements may be most important, least resource intensive, or most feasible. This study sought to identify the most essential components of the AFMRD's Well-Being Action Plan, as rated by expert panelists using a modified Delphi technique.
METHODS: Sixty-eight selected experts were asked to participate; after three rounds of surveys, the final sample included 27 participants (7% residents, 38% MD faculty, 54% behavioral science faculty).
RESULTS: Fourteen elements were rated as essential by at least 80% of the participants. These components included interventions at both the system and individual level. Of those elements ranked in the top five by a majority of the panel, all but one do not mention specific curricular content, but rather discusses the nature of a wellness curriculum.
CONCLUSIONS: The expert consensus was that an essential curriculum should begin early, be longitudinal, identify a champion, and provide support for self-disclosure of struggles.

PMID: 31269221 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Family Physician Burnout and Resilience: A Cross-Sectional Analysis.

Thu, 07/04/2019 - 21:47
Related Articles

Family Physician Burnout and Resilience: A Cross-Sectional Analysis.

Fam Med. 2019 Jul 02;:

Authors: Buck K, Williamson M, Ogbeide S, Norberg B

Abstract
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Current physician burnout levels are at historically high levels, especially in family medicine, with many factors playing a role. The goal of this study was to understand demographic, psychological, environmental, behavioral, and workplace characteristics that impact physician wellness and burnout, focusing on family medicine physicians and residents.
METHODS: Survey respondents were 295 family medicine residents and faculty members across 11 residency programs within the Residency Research Network of Texas (RRNeT). Subjects completed multiple measures to assess resilience, burnout, psychological flexibility, and workplace stress. Respondents also reported personal wellness practices and demographic information. The primary outcome variables were burnout (depersonalization, emotional exhaustion, and personal achievement) and resilience.
RESULTS: The predictor variables contributed significant variance (depersonalization=27.1%, emotional exhaustion=39%, accomplishment=37.7%, resilience=37%) and resulted in large effect sizes (depersonalization f²=.371, emotional exhaustion f²=.639, accomplishment f²=.605, resilience f²=.587) among the three burnout models and the resilience model for the sample. Similar variance and effect sizes were present for independent resident and program faculty samples, with resilience being the only outcome variable with significant differences in variance between the samples.
CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates the roles of both individual and organization change needed to impact provider wellness, with special attention to resilience across faculty and residents. The results of this study may inform workplace policies (ie, organizational practice change) and wellness programming and curricula (ie, individual level) for family medicine residents and program faculty.

PMID: 31269220 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Addressing Mental Health Needs among Physicians.

Wed, 02/06/2019 - 09:11

Addressing Mental Health Needs among Physicians.

South Med J. 2019 Feb;112(2):67-69

Authors: Buck K, Grace A, Runyan T, Brown-Berchtold L

PMID: 30708367 [PubMed - in process]

Psychological Attributes of Ultramarathoners.

Wed, 01/30/2019 - 08:25
Related Articles

Psychological Attributes of Ultramarathoners.

Wilderness Environ Med. 2018 03;29(1):66-71

Authors: Buck K, Spittler J, Reed A, Khodaee M

Abstract
INTRODUCTION: As the popularity of ultramarathon participation increases, there still exists a lack of understanding of the unique psychological characteristics of ultramarathon runners. The current study sought to investigate some of the psychological and behavioral factors that are involved in ultramarathon running.
METHODS: We obtained information from participants of the Bear Chase Trail Race via an online survey. This race is a single-day, multidistance race consisting of a 10 k, half marathon, 50 k, 50 mi, and 100 k run in Lakewood, Colorado, at a base altitude of 1680 m with total altitude in climbs ranging from 663 to 2591 m. We correlated information from the Exercise Addiction Inventory and the Patient Health Questionnaire-2 and demographic information with race finish times.
RESULTS: Out of 200 runners who started the race, 98 (48%) completed the survey. Over half of the runners were men (61.2%), and the average age was 39.0 years (SD±8.9; range 21-64 years). A number of respondents (20%) screened positive for exercise addiction concerns. Approximately 20% of our sample screened positive for depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-2 score >3). The majority of participants reported receiving strong social support from current partners with regard to their ultramarathon running training time and goals.
CONCLUSIONS: Although only a screening, the number of positive screens on the Exercise Addiction Inventory suggests use of screening measures with an ultramarathon running population. Athletes with positive screening tests should be fully evaluated for depression and exercise addiction because this would enable appropriate athlete support and treatment referral.

PMID: 29336959 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]