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Brian Webb, MD

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NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=(webb bg[Author]) AND (John Peter Smith[Affiliation] OR JPS Health Network[Affiliation] OR JPS [Affiliation] NOT Japan Pancreas Society[Affiliation])
Updated: 5 days 56 min ago

Asymptomatic Migration of a Kirschner Wire from the Proximal Aspect of the Humerus to the Thoracic Cavity: A Case Report.

Wed, 01/30/2019 - 08:14
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Asymptomatic Migration of a Kirschner Wire from the Proximal Aspect of the Humerus to the Thoracic Cavity: A Case Report.

JBJS Case Connect. 2016 Jul-Sep;6(3):e77

Authors: Pientka WF, Bates CM, Webb BG

Abstract
CASE: A 78-year-old man presented with an open fracture of the proximal aspect of the humerus and an axillary artery laceration; the fracture was treated provisionally with Kirschner wires (K-wires). Forty-five days postoperatively, he presented with pin prominence at the lateral aspect of the arm, and was incidentally noted to have migration of a separate K-wire to the left lung. He underwent successful thoracotomy and lung wedge resection for wire removal.
CONCLUSION: K-wires used in the fixation of fractures of the proximal aspect of the humerus may migrate into the thoracic cavity. No modification of this technique, including the use of threaded, terminally bent, or external pins that are visibly secured, eliminates the potential for devastating complications.

PMID: 29252654 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Risk factors in total joint arthroplasty: comparison of infection rates in patients with different socioeconomic backgrounds.

Wed, 01/30/2019 - 08:14
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Risk factors in total joint arthroplasty: comparison of infection rates in patients with different socioeconomic backgrounds.

Orthopedics. 2008 May;31(5):445

Authors: Webb BG, Lichtman DM, Wagner RA

Abstract
Infection after total joint arthroplasty is a serious complication. Several risk factors have been shown to increase the risk of total joint infections. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether socioeconomic background was a risk factor for infection in primary total joint arthroplasty. A retrospective chart review was conducted over a 4-year period on a single surgeon's split practice between private patients with mostly private insurance and Medicare and county based patients with predominately indigent county health coverage and Medicaid. An infection rate was calculated for each population in both primary total knee and hip arthroplasty. The two populations were statistically analyzed for differences in age, preoperative diagnoses, and socioeconomic background. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing an increased risk of infection in total joint arthroplasty based on socioeconomic background.

PMID: 19292321 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]