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Travis Motley, DPM

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NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=(motley t[Author]) AND (John Peter Smith[Affiliation] OR JPS Health Network[Affiliation] OR JPS [Affiliation] NOT Japan Pancreas Society[Affiliation])
Updated: 14 hours 26 min ago

Novel Investigation of the Deep Band of the Lateral Plantar Aponeurosis and Its Relationship With the Lateral Plantar Nerve.

Fri, 08/09/2019 - 04:04
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Novel Investigation of the Deep Band of the Lateral Plantar Aponeurosis and Its Relationship With the Lateral Plantar Nerve.

Foot Ankle Int. 2019 Aug 06;:1071100719864352

Authors: Beck CM, Dickerson AR, Kadado KJ, Cohen ZA, Blair SE, Motley TA, Holcomb JC, Fisher CL

Abstract
BACKGROUND: We describe a thick fascial band arising from the medial aspect of the lateral plantar aponeurosis diving deep into the forefoot crossing over a branch of the lateral plantar nerve. Because a review of current literature resulted in limited and outdated sources, we sought to first determine the frequency of this fascial band and the location where it crosses the lateral plantar nerve and, second, discuss the clinical applications these anatomical findings could have.
METHODS: 50 pairs of cadaveric feet (n = 100) were dissected to investigate for presence of the fascial band and its interaction with the lateral plantar nerve. Images were taken of each foot with the fascial band. ImageJ was used to take 2 measurements assessing the relationship of the tuberosity of the base of the fifth metatarsal to where the nerve crossed deep to the fascial band.
RESULTS: Overall, 38% of the feet possessed the fascial band. It was found unilaterally in 10 pairs and bilaterally in 14 pairs. On average, the point at which the lateral plantar nerve passed deep to the fascial band was 2.0 cm medial and 1.7 cm anterior to the tuberosity of the base of the fifth metatarsal.
CONCLUSION: When present, the deep band of the lateral plantar aponeurosis (PA) was consistently found to be crossing the lateral plantar nerve. The discovery of the location where this most commonly occurs has not been previously reported and adds an interesting dimension that elevates an anatomical study to one that has clinical potential.
CLINICAL RELEVANCE: The established target zone gives a precise location for where the relationship between the deep band of the lateral PA and the lateral plantar nerve exists when evaluating the foot. The target zone provides a potential springboard for future investigations concerning said relationship clinically.

PMID: 31387386 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Clinical Outcomes for Diabetic Foot Ulcers Treated with Clostridial Collagenase Ointment or with a Product Containing Silver.

Wed, 01/30/2019 - 08:38
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Clinical Outcomes for Diabetic Foot Ulcers Treated with Clostridial Collagenase Ointment or with a Product Containing Silver.

Adv Wound Care (New Rochelle). 2018 Oct 01;7(10):339-348

Authors: Motley TA, Caporusso JM, Lange DL, Eichelkraut RA, Cargill DI, Dickerson JE

Abstract
Objective: To compare outcomes of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) treated with clostridial collagenase ointment (CCO) or silver-containing products, both in combination with sharp debridement as needed. Approach: One hundred two subjects with qualifying DFUs were randomized to daily treatment with either CCO or a silver-containing product for 6 weeks followed by a 4 -week follow-up period. The primary outcome was the mean percent reduction in DFU area. A secondary outcome was the incidence of ulcer infections between groups. Results: At the end of treatment, the mean percent reduction in area from baseline of DFUs treated with CCO was 62% (p < 0.0001) and with silver was 40% (p < 0.0001). The difference between groups-22%-was not statistically significant (p = 0.071). Among ulcers closed by the end of treatment, the mean time to closure was 31.1 ± 9.0 days versus 37.1 ± 7.7 days, respectively (not statistically significant). There was a numerically greater incidence of target ulcer infections in the silver group (11, 21.6%) than in the CCO group (5, 9.8%; p = 0.208). No clinically relevant safety signals were identified in either group. Innovation: CCO treatment can progress a wound toward closure. Ulcer infection prophylaxis may not be sacrificed when treating DFU with CCO in lieu of silver-containing products. Conclusion: Both CCO and silver-containing products promote significant reduction in DFU area over 6 weeks of treatment with no clinically relevant safety concerns. Mean percent reduction in lesion area was numerically (22%) but not significantly greater with CCO compared to silver, as was time to ulcer closure, with an incidence of ulcer infection at least as low as for silver-containing products.

PMID: 30374419 [PubMed]