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Jamie Huff, DO

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NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=(huff jb[Author]) AND (John Peter Smith[Affiliation] OR JPS Health Network[Affiliation] OR JPS [Affiliation] OR University of North Texas Health Science Center [Affiliation] NOT Japan Pancreas Society[Affiliation])
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Lymphatic pump treatment augments lymphatic flux of lymphocytes in rats.

Wed, 01/30/2019 - 08:21
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Lymphatic pump treatment augments lymphatic flux of lymphocytes in rats.

Lymphat Res Biol. 2010 Dec;8(4):183-7

Authors: Huff JB, Schander A, Downey HF, Hodge LM

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Lymphatic pump techniques (LPT) are used by osteopathic practitioners for the treatment of edema and infection; however, the mechanisms by which LPT enhances the lymphatic and immune systems are poorly understood.
METHODS AND RESULTS: To measure the effect of LPT on the rat, the cisterna chyli (CC) of 10 rats were cannulated and lymph was collected during 4 min of 1) pre-LPT baseline, 2) 4 min LPT, and 3) 10 min post-LPT recovery. LPT increased significantly (p < 0.05) lymph flow from a baseline of 24 ± 5 μl/min to 89 ± 30 μl/min. The baseline CC lymphocyte flux was 0.65 ± 0.21 × 10⁶ lymphocytes/min, and LPT increased CC lymphocyte flux to 6.10 ± 0.99 × 10⁶ lymphocytes/min (p < 0.01). LPT had no preferential effect on any lymphocyte population, since total lymphocytes, CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, and B cell numbers were similarly increased. To determine if LPT mobilized gut-associated lymphocytes into the CC lymph, gut-associated lymphocytes in the CC lymph were identified by staining CC lymphocytes for the gut homing receptor integrin α4β7. LPT significantly increased (p < 0.01) the flux of α4β7 positive CC lymphocytes from a baseline of 0.70 ± 0.03 × 10⁵ lymphocytes/min to 6.50 ± 0.10 × 10⁵ lymphocytes/min during LPT. Finally, lymphocyte flux during recovery was similar to baseline, indicating the effects of LPT are transient.
CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, these results suggest that LPT may enhance immune surveillance by increasing the numbers of lymphocytes released in to lymphatic circulation, especially from the gut associated lymphoid tissue. The rat provides a useful model to further investigate the effect of LPT on the lymphatic and immune systems.

PMID: 21190489 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Lymphatic pump treatment mobilizes leukocytes from the gut associated lymphoid tissue into lymph.

Wed, 01/30/2019 - 08:21
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Lymphatic pump treatment mobilizes leukocytes from the gut associated lymphoid tissue into lymph.

Lymphat Res Biol. 2010 Jun;8(2):103-10

Authors: Hodge LM, Bearden MK, Schander A, Huff JB, Williams A, King HH, Downey HF

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Lymphatic pump techniques (LPT) are used clinically by osteopathic practitioners for the treatment of edema and infection; however, the mechanisms by which LPT enhances lymphatic circulation and provides protection during infection are not understood. Rhythmic compressions on the abdomen during LPT compress the abdominal area, including the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT), which may facilitate the release of leukocytes from these tissues into the lymphatic circulation. This study is the first to document LPT-induced mobilization of leukocytes from the GALT into the lymphatic circulation.
METHODS AND RESULTS: Catheters were inserted into either the thoracic or mesenteric lymph ducts of dogs. To determine if LPT enhanced the release of leukocytes from the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) into lymph, the MLN were fluorescently labeled in situ. Lymph was collected during 4 min pre-LPT, 4 min LPT, and 10 min following cessation of LPT. LPT significantly increased lymph flow and leukocytes in both mesenteric and thoracic duct lymph. LPT had no preferential effect on any specific leukocyte population, since neutrophil, monocyte, CD4+ T cell, CD8+ T cell, IgG+B cell, and IgA+B cell numbers were similarly increased. In addition, LPT significantly increased the mobilization of leukocytes from the MLN into lymph. Lymph flow and leukocyte counts fell following LPT treatment, indicating that the effects of LPT are transient.
CONCLUSIONS: LPT mobilizes leukocytes from GALT, and these leukocytes are transported by the lymphatic circulation. This enhanced release of leukocytes from GALT may provide scientific rationale for the clinical use of LPT to improve immune function.

PMID: 20583872 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]