Search this website

Kathleen Delaney, MD

Subscribe to Kathleen Delaney, MD feed Kathleen Delaney, MD
NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=(delaney ka[Author]) AND (John Peter Smith[Affiliation] OR JPS Health Network[Affiliation] OR JPS [Affiliation] NOT Japan Pancreas Society[Affiliation])
Updated: 5 days 39 min ago

Roles of disease severity and post-discharge outpatient visits as predictors of hospital readmissions.

Wed, 01/30/2019 - 08:26
Related Articles

Roles of disease severity and post-discharge outpatient visits as predictors of hospital readmissions.

BMC Health Serv Res. 2016 10 10;16(1):564

Authors: Wang H, Johnson C, Robinson RD, Nejtek VA, Schrader CD, Leuck J, Umejiego J, Trop A, Delaney KA, Zenarosa NR

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Risks prediction models of 30-day all-cause hospital readmissions are multi-factorial. Severity of illness (SOI) and risk of mortality (ROM) categorized by All Patient Refined Diagnosis Related Groups (APR-DRG) seem to predict hospital readmission but lack large sample validation. Effects of risk reduction interventions including providing post-discharge outpatient visits remain uncertain. We aim to determine the accuracy of using SOI and ROM to predict readmission and further investigate the role of outpatient visits in association with hospital readmission.
METHODS: Hospital readmission data were reviewed retrospectively from September 2012 through June 2015. Patient demographics and clinical variables including insurance type, homeless status, substance abuse, psychiatric problems, length of stay, SOI, ROM, ICD-10 diagnoses and medications prescribed at discharge, and prescription ratio at discharge (number of medications prescribed divided by number of ICD-10 diagnoses) were analyzed using logistic regression. Relationships among SOI, type of hospital visits, time between hospital visits, and readmissions were also investigated.
RESULTS: A total of 6011 readmissions occurred from 55,532 index admissions. The adjusted odds ratios of SOI and ROM predicting readmissions were 1.31 (SOI: 95 % CI 1.25-1.38) and 1.09 (ROM: 95 % CI 1.05-1.14) separately. Ninety percent (5381/6011) of patients were readmitted from the Emergency Department (ED) or Urgent Care Center (UCC). Average time interval from index discharge date to ED/UCC visit was 9 days in both the no readmission and readmission groups (p > 0.05). Similar hospital readmission rates were noted during the first 10 days from index discharge regardless of whether post-index discharge patient clinic visits occurred when time-to-event analysis was performed.
CONCLUSIONS: SOI and ROM significantly predict hospital readmission risk in general. Most readmissions occurred among patients presenting for ED/UCC visits after index discharge. Simply providing early post-discharge follow-up clinic visits does not seem to prevent hospital readmissions.

PMID: 27724889 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Predictors of mortality among initially stable adult pelvic trauma patients in the US: Data analysis from the National Trauma Data Bank.

Wed, 01/30/2019 - 08:26
Related Articles

Predictors of mortality among initially stable adult pelvic trauma patients in the US: Data analysis from the National Trauma Data Bank.

Injury. 2015 Nov;46(11):2113-7

Authors: Wang H, Phillips JL, Robinson RD, Duane TM, Buca S, Campbell-Furtick MB, Jennings A, Miller T, Zenarosa NR, Delaney KA

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Pelvic fractures are associated with increased risk of death among trauma patients. Studies show independent risks predicting mortality among patients with pelvic fractures vary across different geographic regions. This study analyses national data to determine predictors of mortality in initially stable adult pelvic trauma patients in the US.
METHODS: This study is a retrospective analysis of the US National Trauma Data Bank from January 2003 to December 2010 among trauma patients ≥18 years of age with pelvic fractures (including acetabulum). Over 150 variables were reviewed and analysed. The primary outcome was all-cause in-hospital mortality. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine independent risk factors predictive of in-hospital mortality in stable pelvic fracture patients.
RESULTS: 30,800 patients were included in the final analysis. Overall in-hospital mortality rate was 2.7%. Mortality increased twofold in middle aged patients (age 55-70), and increased nearly fourfold in patients with advanced age ≥70. We found patients with advanced age, higher severity of injury, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) <8, GCS between 9 and 12, prolonged mechanical ventilation, and/or in-hospital blood product administration experienced higher mortality. Patients transported to level 1 or level 2 trauma centres experienced lower mortality while concomitantly experiencing higher associated internal injuries.
CONCLUSIONS: Geriatric and middle aged pelvic fracture patients experience higher mortality. Predictors of mortality in initially stable pelvic fracture patients are advanced age, injury severity, mental status, prolonged mechanical ventilation, and/or in-hospital blood product administration. These patients might benefit from transport to local level 1 or level 2 trauma centres.

PMID: 26377773 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Using the LACE index to predict hospital readmissions in congestive heart failure patients.

Wed, 01/30/2019 - 08:26
Related Articles

Using the LACE index to predict hospital readmissions in congestive heart failure patients.

BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2014 Aug 07;14:97

Authors: Wang H, Robinson RD, Johnson C, Zenarosa NR, Jayswal RD, Keithley J, Delaney KA

Abstract
BACKGROUND: The LACE index has been used to predict the risk of unplanned readmission within 30 days after hospital discharge in both medical and surgical patients. The aim of this study is to validate the accuracy of using the LACE index in CHF patients.
METHODS: This was a retrospective study. The LACE index score was calculated on each patient who was admitted to hospital due to an acute CHF exacerbation. Operational and clinical variables were collected from patients including basic clinical characteristics, length of hospitalization, comorbidities, number of previous ED visits in the past 6 months before the index admission, and the number of post discharge ED revisits at 30, 60, and 90 days. All variables were analyzed by multivariate logistic regression to determine the association between clinical variables and the hospital unplanned readmissions. C-statistic was used to discriminate those patients with high risk of readmissions.
RESULTS: Of the 253 patients included in the study, 24.50% (62/253) experienced unplanned readmission to hospital within 30 days after discharge. The LACE index was slightly higher in patients readmitted versus patients not readmitted (12.17 ± 2.22 versus 11.80 ± 1.92, p = 0.199). Adjusted odds ratios based on logistic regression of all clinical variables showed only the number of previous ED visits (OR 1.79, 95% CI 1.30-2.47, p < 0.001), history of myocardial infarction (OR 2.51, 95% CI 1.02-6.21, p = 0.045), and history of peripheral vascular disease (OR 10.75, 95% CI 1.52-75.73, p = 0.017) increased the risk of unplanned readmission within 30 days of hospital discharge. However, patients with high LACE scores (≥10) had a significantly higher rate of ED revisits (15.04% vs 0%) within 30 days from the index discharge than those with low LACE scores (p = 0.030).
CONCLUSION: The LACE index may not accurately predict unplanned readmissions within 30 days from hospital discharge in CHF patients. The LACE high risk index may have utility as a screening tool to predict high risk ED revisits after hospital discharge.

PMID: 25099997 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

The accuracy of interqual criteria in determining the need for observation versus hospitalization in emergency department patients with chronic heart failure.

Wed, 01/30/2019 - 08:26
Related Articles

The accuracy of interqual criteria in determining the need for observation versus hospitalization in emergency department patients with chronic heart failure.

Crit Pathw Cardiol. 2013 Dec;12(4):192-6

Authors: Wang H, Robinson RD, Coppola M, Fernandez D, Ros F, Zenarosa NR, Burton MJ, Delaney KA

Abstract
McKesson's Interqual criteria are one of the medical screening criteria that are widely used in emergency departments (EDs) to determine if patients qualify for observation or inpatient admission. Chronic heart failure (CHF) is one of the most common yet severe cardiovascular diseases seen in the ED with a relatively higher admission rate. This study is to evaluate the accuracy of Interqual criteria in determining observation versus hospitalization need in CHF patients. From January 2009 till December 2010, data from 503 CHF patients were reviewed. One hundred twenty-two patients were observed and 381 patients were admitted. Only one variable (blood urea nitrogen, ≥30 mg/dL; odds ratio, 2.44) from Interqual criteria had reached statistical significant difference between observation and hospitalization groups. Our results showed that based on the initial review at ED, clinical variables from Interqual criteria did not appear to help accurately predict the level of care in CHF patient in our patient population. Other clinical variables may need to be added in the criteria for better prediction.

PMID: 24240548 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Geriatric Trauma Patients With Cervical Spine Fractures due to Ground Level Fall: Five Years Experience in a Level One Trauma Center.

Wed, 01/30/2019 - 08:26
Related Articles

Geriatric Trauma Patients With Cervical Spine Fractures due to Ground Level Fall: Five Years Experience in a Level One Trauma Center.

J Clin Med Res. 2013 Apr;5(2):75-83

Authors: Wang H, Coppola M, Robinson RD, Scribner JT, Vithalani V, de Moor CE, Gandhi RR, Burton M, Delaney KA

Abstract
BACKGROUND: It has been found that significantly different clinical outcomes occur in trauma patients with different mechanisms of injury. Ground level falls (GLF) are usually considered "minor trauma" with less injury occurred in general. However, it is not uncommon that geriatric trauma patients sustain cervical spine (C-spine) fractures with other associated injuries due to GLF or less. The aim of this study is to determine the injury patterns and the roles of clinical risk factors in these geriatric trauma patients.
METHODS: Data were reviewed from the institutional trauma registry of our local level 1 trauma center. All patients had sustained C-spine fracture(s). Basic clinical characteristics, the distribution of C-spine fracture(s), and mechanism of injury in geriatric patients (65 years or older) were compared with those less than 65 years old. Furthermore, different clinical variables including age, gender, Glasgow coma scale (GCS), blood alcohol level, and co-existing injuries were analyzed by multivariate logistic regression in geriatric trauma patients due to GLF and internally validated by random bootstrapping technique.
RESULTS: From 2006 - 2010, a total of 12,805 trauma patients were included in trauma registry, of which 726 (5.67%) had sustained C-spine fracture(s). Among all C-spine fracture patients, 19.15% (139/726) were geriatric patients. Of these geriatric patients 27.34% (38/139) and 53.96% (75/139) had C1 and C2 fractures compared with 13.63% (80/587) and 21.98% (129/587) in young trauma patients (P < 0.001). Of geriatric trauma patients 13.67% (19/139) and 18.71% (26/139) had C6 and C7 fractures compared with 32.03% (188/587) and 41.40% (243/587) in younger ones separately (P < 0.001). Furthermore, 53.96% (75/139) geriatric patients had sustained C-spine fractures due to GLF with more upper C-spine fractures (C1 and C2). Only 3.2% of those had positive blood alcohol levels compared with 52.9% of younger patients (P < 0.001). In addition, 6.34% of geriatric patients due to GLF had intracranial pathology (ICP) which was one of the most common co-injuries with C-spine fractures. Logistic regression analysis showed the adjusted odds ratios of 1.17 (age) and 91.57 (male) in geriatric GLF patients to predict this co-injury pattern of C-spine fracture and ICP.
CONCLUSION: Geriatric patients tend to sustain more upper C-spine fractures than non-geriatric patients regardless of the mechanisms. GLF or less not only can cause isolated C-spines fracture(s) but also lead to other significant injuries with ICP as the most common one in geriatric patients. Advanced age and male are two risk factors that can predict this co-injury pattern. In addition, it seems that alcohol plays no role in the cause of GLF in geriatric trauma patients.

PMID: 23519239 [PubMed]