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Traumatic colon injury in damage control laparotomy-A multicenter trial: Is it safe to do a delayed anastomosis?

Wed, 01/30/2019 - 07:24
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Traumatic colon injury in damage control laparotomy-A multicenter trial: Is it safe to do a delayed anastomosis?

J Trauma Acute Care Surg. 2017 Apr;82(4):742-749

Authors: Tatebe LC, Jennings A, Tatebe K, Handy A, Prajapati P, Smith M, Do T, Ogola GO, Gandhi RR, Duane TM, Luk S, Petrey LB

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Delayed colonic anastomosis after damage control laparotomy (DCL) is an alternative to colostomies during a single laparotomy (SL) in high-risk patients. However, literature suggests increased colonic leak rates up to 27% with DCL, and various reported risk factors. We evaluated our regional experience to determine if delayed colonic anastomosis was associated with worse outcomes.
METHODS: A multicenter retrospective cohort study was performed across three Level I trauma centers encompassing traumatic colon injuries from January 2006 through June 2014. Patients with rectal injuries or mortality within 24 hours were excluded. Patient and injury characteristics, complications, and interventions were compared between SL and DCL groups. Regional readmission data were utilized to capture complications within 6 months of index trauma.
RESULTS: Of 267 patients, 69% had penetrating injuries, 21% underwent DCL, and the mortality rate was 4.9%. Overall, 176 received primary repair (26 in DCL), 90 had resection and anastomosis (28 in DCL), and 26 had a stoma created (10 end colostomies and 2 loop ileostomies in DCL). Thirty-five of 56 DCL patients had definitive colonic repair subsequent to their index operation. DCL patients were more likely to be hypotensive; require more resuscitation; and suffer acute kidney injury, pneumonia, adult respiratory distress syndrome, and death. Five enteric leaks (1.9%) and three enterocutaneous fistulas (ECF, 1.1%) were identified, proportionately distributed between DCL and SL (p = 1.00, p = 0.51). No difference was seen in intraperitoneal abscesses (p = 0.13) or surgical site infections (SSI, p = 0.70) between cohorts. Among SL patients, pancreas injuries portended an increased risk of intraperitoneal abscesses (p = 0.0002), as did liver injuries in DCL patients (p = 0.06).
CONCLUSIONS: DCL was not associated with increased enteric leaks, ECF, SSI, or intraperitoneal abscesses despite nearly two-thirds having delayed repair. Despite this being a multicenter study, it is underpowered, and a prospective trial would better demonstrate risks of DCL in colon trauma.
LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic study, level IV.

PMID: 28323788 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Predictors of mortality among initially stable adult pelvic trauma patients in the US: Data analysis from the National Trauma Data Bank.

Wed, 01/30/2019 - 07:24
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Predictors of mortality among initially stable adult pelvic trauma patients in the US: Data analysis from the National Trauma Data Bank.

Injury. 2015 Nov;46(11):2113-7

Authors: Wang H, Phillips JL, Robinson RD, Duane TM, Buca S, Campbell-Furtick MB, Jennings A, Miller T, Zenarosa NR, Delaney KA

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Pelvic fractures are associated with increased risk of death among trauma patients. Studies show independent risks predicting mortality among patients with pelvic fractures vary across different geographic regions. This study analyses national data to determine predictors of mortality in initially stable adult pelvic trauma patients in the US.
METHODS: This study is a retrospective analysis of the US National Trauma Data Bank from January 2003 to December 2010 among trauma patients ≥18 years of age with pelvic fractures (including acetabulum). Over 150 variables were reviewed and analysed. The primary outcome was all-cause in-hospital mortality. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine independent risk factors predictive of in-hospital mortality in stable pelvic fracture patients.
RESULTS: 30,800 patients were included in the final analysis. Overall in-hospital mortality rate was 2.7%. Mortality increased twofold in middle aged patients (age 55-70), and increased nearly fourfold in patients with advanced age ≥70. We found patients with advanced age, higher severity of injury, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) <8, GCS between 9 and 12, prolonged mechanical ventilation, and/or in-hospital blood product administration experienced higher mortality. Patients transported to level 1 or level 2 trauma centres experienced lower mortality while concomitantly experiencing higher associated internal injuries.
CONCLUSIONS: Geriatric and middle aged pelvic fracture patients experience higher mortality. Predictors of mortality in initially stable pelvic fracture patients are advanced age, injury severity, mental status, prolonged mechanical ventilation, and/or in-hospital blood product administration. These patients might benefit from transport to local level 1 or level 2 trauma centres.

PMID: 26377773 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]