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Successful implementation of an appendectomy process improvement protocol.

Related Articles

Successful implementation of an appendectomy process improvement protocol.

Trauma Surg Acute Care Open. 2019;4(1):e000303

Authors: Bradley M, Kindvall A, Logan J, Bailey J, Elster E, Rodriguez C

Abstract
Background: A key component of a process improvement program is the institution of hospital-specific protocols to address certain disparities and streamline patient care. In that regard, we evaluated the implementation of an outpatient laparoscopic appendectomy (OLA) protocol at a tertiary military hospital. We hypothesized that OLA would reduce length of stay (LOS) without increasing complications.
Methods: In August 2016, our institution implemented an OLA protocol-defined as discharge within 24 hours of surgery. Exclusion criteria included age <18 years old, grade 4 or 5 appendicitis, immunosuppression, current pregnancy, and no supervision during the first 24 hours postdischarge. To determine OLA's effect on LOS, analysis of variance was used to perform a comparison between the years 2014 and 2017. Successful outpatient appendectomies were recorded preprotocol and postprotocol, as well as readmission complications.
Results: In 2017, the first full year of protocol implementation, 44 of 59 (75%) patients met the inclusion criteria, and all but 2 (42 of 44, 95%) stayed for less than 24 hours. Of the two outliers, one developed acute on chronic kidney disease and one had a slow return of bowel function following grade 3 appendicitis. Complications were low across all years (one per year). In 2017, the readmission was for percutaneous drainage of an abscess. Overall, protocol implementation produced a significant decrease in LOS.
Discussion: OLA protocol decreased LOS at a military hospital and should be expanded to other department of defense (DoD) facilities. Further research is needed to identify cost benefit to the military health system.
Level of evidence: III.

PMID: 31321311 [PubMed]

Common step-wise interventions improved primary care clinic visits and reduced emergency department discharge failures: a large-scale retrospective observational study.

Richard Robinson, MD - Fri, 07/12/2019 - 00:24
Related Articles

Common step-wise interventions improved primary care clinic visits and reduced emergency department discharge failures: a large-scale retrospective observational study.

BMC Health Serv Res. 2019 Jul 04;19(1):451

Authors: Schrader CD, Robinson RD, Blair S, Shaikh S, Ho AF, D'Etienne JP, Kirby JJ, Cheeti R, Zenarosa NR, Wang H

Abstract
BACKGROUND: It is critical to understand whether providing health insurance coverage, assigning a dedicated Primary Care Physician (PCP), and arranging timely post-Emergency Department (ED) clinic follow-up can improve compliance with clinic visits and reduce ED discharge failures. We aim to determine the benefits of providing these common step-wise interventions and further investigate the necessity of urgent PCP referrals on behalf of ED discharged patients.
METHODS: This is a single-center retrospective observational study. All patients discharged from the ED over the period Jan 1, 2015 through Dec 31, 2017 were included in the study population. Step-wise interventions included providing charity health insurance, assigning a dedicated PCP, and providing ED follow-up clinics. PCP clinic compliance and ED discharge failures were measured and compared among groups receiving different interventions.
RESULT: A total of 227,627 patients were included. Fifty-eight percent of patients receiving charity insurance had PCP visits in comparison to 23% of patients without charity insurance (p < 0.001). Seventy-seven percent of patients with charity insurance and PCP assignments completed post-ED discharge PCP visits in comparison to only 4.5% of those with neither charity insurance nor PCP assignments (p < 0.001).
CONCLUSIONS: Step-wise interventions increased patient clinic follow-up compliance while simultaneously reducing ED discharge failures. Such interventions might benefit communities with similar patient populations.

PMID: 31272442 [PubMed - in process]

Common step-wise interventions improved primary care clinic visits and reduced emergency department discharge failures: a large-scale retrospective observational study.

James d'Etienne, MD - Fri, 07/12/2019 - 00:24
Related Articles

Common step-wise interventions improved primary care clinic visits and reduced emergency department discharge failures: a large-scale retrospective observational study.

BMC Health Serv Res. 2019 Jul 04;19(1):451

Authors: Schrader CD, Robinson RD, Blair S, Shaikh S, Ho AF, D'Etienne JP, Kirby JJ, Cheeti R, Zenarosa NR, Wang H

Abstract
BACKGROUND: It is critical to understand whether providing health insurance coverage, assigning a dedicated Primary Care Physician (PCP), and arranging timely post-Emergency Department (ED) clinic follow-up can improve compliance with clinic visits and reduce ED discharge failures. We aim to determine the benefits of providing these common step-wise interventions and further investigate the necessity of urgent PCP referrals on behalf of ED discharged patients.
METHODS: This is a single-center retrospective observational study. All patients discharged from the ED over the period Jan 1, 2015 through Dec 31, 2017 were included in the study population. Step-wise interventions included providing charity health insurance, assigning a dedicated PCP, and providing ED follow-up clinics. PCP clinic compliance and ED discharge failures were measured and compared among groups receiving different interventions.
RESULT: A total of 227,627 patients were included. Fifty-eight percent of patients receiving charity insurance had PCP visits in comparison to 23% of patients without charity insurance (p < 0.001). Seventy-seven percent of patients with charity insurance and PCP assignments completed post-ED discharge PCP visits in comparison to only 4.5% of those with neither charity insurance nor PCP assignments (p < 0.001).
CONCLUSIONS: Step-wise interventions increased patient clinic follow-up compliance while simultaneously reducing ED discharge failures. Such interventions might benefit communities with similar patient populations.

PMID: 31272442 [PubMed - in process]

Common step-wise interventions improved primary care clinic visits and reduced emergency department discharge failures: a large-scale retrospective observational study.

Hao Wang, MD - Fri, 07/12/2019 - 00:24
Related Articles

Common step-wise interventions improved primary care clinic visits and reduced emergency department discharge failures: a large-scale retrospective observational study.

BMC Health Serv Res. 2019 Jul 04;19(1):451

Authors: Schrader CD, Robinson RD, Blair S, Shaikh S, Ho AF, D'Etienne JP, Kirby JJ, Cheeti R, Zenarosa NR, Wang H

Abstract
BACKGROUND: It is critical to understand whether providing health insurance coverage, assigning a dedicated Primary Care Physician (PCP), and arranging timely post-Emergency Department (ED) clinic follow-up can improve compliance with clinic visits and reduce ED discharge failures. We aim to determine the benefits of providing these common step-wise interventions and further investigate the necessity of urgent PCP referrals on behalf of ED discharged patients.
METHODS: This is a single-center retrospective observational study. All patients discharged from the ED over the period Jan 1, 2015 through Dec 31, 2017 were included in the study population. Step-wise interventions included providing charity health insurance, assigning a dedicated PCP, and providing ED follow-up clinics. PCP clinic compliance and ED discharge failures were measured and compared among groups receiving different interventions.
RESULT: A total of 227,627 patients were included. Fifty-eight percent of patients receiving charity insurance had PCP visits in comparison to 23% of patients without charity insurance (p < 0.001). Seventy-seven percent of patients with charity insurance and PCP assignments completed post-ED discharge PCP visits in comparison to only 4.5% of those with neither charity insurance nor PCP assignments (p < 0.001).
CONCLUSIONS: Step-wise interventions increased patient clinic follow-up compliance while simultaneously reducing ED discharge failures. Such interventions might benefit communities with similar patient populations.

PMID: 31272442 [PubMed - in process]

Common step-wise interventions improved primary care clinic visits and reduced emergency department discharge failures: a large-scale retrospective observational study.

Chet Schrader, MD - Fri, 07/12/2019 - 00:24
Related Articles

Common step-wise interventions improved primary care clinic visits and reduced emergency department discharge failures: a large-scale retrospective observational study.

BMC Health Serv Res. 2019 Jul 04;19(1):451

Authors: Schrader CD, Robinson RD, Blair S, Shaikh S, Ho AF, D'Etienne JP, Kirby JJ, Cheeti R, Zenarosa NR, Wang H

Abstract
BACKGROUND: It is critical to understand whether providing health insurance coverage, assigning a dedicated Primary Care Physician (PCP), and arranging timely post-Emergency Department (ED) clinic follow-up can improve compliance with clinic visits and reduce ED discharge failures. We aim to determine the benefits of providing these common step-wise interventions and further investigate the necessity of urgent PCP referrals on behalf of ED discharged patients.
METHODS: This is a single-center retrospective observational study. All patients discharged from the ED over the period Jan 1, 2015 through Dec 31, 2017 were included in the study population. Step-wise interventions included providing charity health insurance, assigning a dedicated PCP, and providing ED follow-up clinics. PCP clinic compliance and ED discharge failures were measured and compared among groups receiving different interventions.
RESULT: A total of 227,627 patients were included. Fifty-eight percent of patients receiving charity insurance had PCP visits in comparison to 23% of patients without charity insurance (p < 0.001). Seventy-seven percent of patients with charity insurance and PCP assignments completed post-ED discharge PCP visits in comparison to only 4.5% of those with neither charity insurance nor PCP assignments (p < 0.001).
CONCLUSIONS: Step-wise interventions increased patient clinic follow-up compliance while simultaneously reducing ED discharge failures. Such interventions might benefit communities with similar patient populations.

PMID: 31272442 [PubMed - in process]

Common step-wise interventions improved primary care clinic visits and reduced emergency department discharge failures: a large-scale retrospective observational study.

Related Articles

Common step-wise interventions improved primary care clinic visits and reduced emergency department discharge failures: a large-scale retrospective observational study.

BMC Health Serv Res. 2019 Jul 04;19(1):451

Authors: Schrader CD, Robinson RD, Blair S, Shaikh S, Ho AF, D'Etienne JP, Kirby JJ, Cheeti R, Zenarosa NR, Wang H

Abstract
BACKGROUND: It is critical to understand whether providing health insurance coverage, assigning a dedicated Primary Care Physician (PCP), and arranging timely post-Emergency Department (ED) clinic follow-up can improve compliance with clinic visits and reduce ED discharge failures. We aim to determine the benefits of providing these common step-wise interventions and further investigate the necessity of urgent PCP referrals on behalf of ED discharged patients.
METHODS: This is a single-center retrospective observational study. All patients discharged from the ED over the period Jan 1, 2015 through Dec 31, 2017 were included in the study population. Step-wise interventions included providing charity health insurance, assigning a dedicated PCP, and providing ED follow-up clinics. PCP clinic compliance and ED discharge failures were measured and compared among groups receiving different interventions.
RESULT: A total of 227,627 patients were included. Fifty-eight percent of patients receiving charity insurance had PCP visits in comparison to 23% of patients without charity insurance (p < 0.001). Seventy-seven percent of patients with charity insurance and PCP assignments completed post-ED discharge PCP visits in comparison to only 4.5% of those with neither charity insurance nor PCP assignments (p < 0.001).
CONCLUSIONS: Step-wise interventions increased patient clinic follow-up compliance while simultaneously reducing ED discharge failures. Such interventions might benefit communities with similar patient populations.

PMID: 31272442 [PubMed - in process]

Making Sense of Family Medicine Resident Wellness Curricula: A Delphi Study of Content Experts.

Katherine Buck, PhD - Thu, 07/04/2019 - 21:47
Related Articles

Making Sense of Family Medicine Resident Wellness Curricula: A Delphi Study of Content Experts.

Fam Med. 2019 Jul 02;:

Authors: Penwell-Waines L, Runyan C, Kolobova I, Grace A, Brennan J, Buck K, Ross V, Schneiderhan J

Abstract
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The Association of Family Medicine Residency Directors (AFMRD) Physician Wellness Task Force released a comprehensive Well-Being Action Plan as a guide to help programs create a culture of wellness. The plan, however, does not offer a recommendation as to which elements may be most important, least resource intensive, or most feasible. This study sought to identify the most essential components of the AFMRD's Well-Being Action Plan, as rated by expert panelists using a modified Delphi technique.
METHODS: Sixty-eight selected experts were asked to participate; after three rounds of surveys, the final sample included 27 participants (7% residents, 38% MD faculty, 54% behavioral science faculty).
RESULTS: Fourteen elements were rated as essential by at least 80% of the participants. These components included interventions at both the system and individual level. Of those elements ranked in the top five by a majority of the panel, all but one do not mention specific curricular content, but rather discusses the nature of a wellness curriculum.
CONCLUSIONS: The expert consensus was that an essential curriculum should begin early, be longitudinal, identify a champion, and provide support for self-disclosure of struggles.

PMID: 31269221 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Family Physician Burnout and Resilience: A Cross-Sectional Analysis.

Katherine Buck, PhD - Thu, 07/04/2019 - 21:47
Related Articles

Family Physician Burnout and Resilience: A Cross-Sectional Analysis.

Fam Med. 2019 Jul 02;:

Authors: Buck K, Williamson M, Ogbeide S, Norberg B

Abstract
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Current physician burnout levels are at historically high levels, especially in family medicine, with many factors playing a role. The goal of this study was to understand demographic, psychological, environmental, behavioral, and workplace characteristics that impact physician wellness and burnout, focusing on family medicine physicians and residents.
METHODS: Survey respondents were 295 family medicine residents and faculty members across 11 residency programs within the Residency Research Network of Texas (RRNeT). Subjects completed multiple measures to assess resilience, burnout, psychological flexibility, and workplace stress. Respondents also reported personal wellness practices and demographic information. The primary outcome variables were burnout (depersonalization, emotional exhaustion, and personal achievement) and resilience.
RESULTS: The predictor variables contributed significant variance (depersonalization=27.1%, emotional exhaustion=39%, accomplishment=37.7%, resilience=37%) and resulted in large effect sizes (depersonalization f²=.371, emotional exhaustion f²=.639, accomplishment f²=.605, resilience f²=.587) among the three burnout models and the resilience model for the sample. Similar variance and effect sizes were present for independent resident and program faculty samples, with resilience being the only outcome variable with significant differences in variance between the samples.
CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates the roles of both individual and organization change needed to impact provider wellness, with special attention to resilience across faculty and residents. The results of this study may inform workplace policies (ie, organizational practice change) and wellness programming and curricula (ie, individual level) for family medicine residents and program faculty.

PMID: 31269220 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Identifying diverse concepts of discharge failure patients at emergency department in the USA: a large-scale retrospective observational study.

Richard Robinson, MD - Thu, 07/04/2019 - 21:46
Related Articles

Identifying diverse concepts of discharge failure patients at emergency department in the USA: a large-scale retrospective observational study.

BMJ Open. 2019 Jun 27;9(6):e028051

Authors: Schrader CD, Robinson RD, Blair S, Shaikh S, d'Etienne JP, Kirby JJ, Cheeti R, Zenarosa NR, Wang H

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Identifying patients who are at high risk for discharge failure allows for implementation of interventions to improve their care. However, discharge failure is currently defined in literature with great variability, making targeted interventions more difficult. We aim to derive a screening tool based on the existing diverse discharge failure models.
DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: This is a single-centre retrospective cohort study in the USA. Data from all patients discharged from the emergency department were collected from 1 January 2015 through 31 December 2017 and followed up within 30 days.
METHODS: Scoring systems were derived using modified Framingham methods. Sensitivity, specificity and area under the receiver operational characteristic (AUC) were calculated and compared using both the broad and restricted discharge failure models.
RESULTS: A total of 227 627 patients were included. The Screening for Healthcare fOllow-Up Tool (SHOUT) scoring system was derived based on the broad and restricted discharge failure models and applied back to the entire study cohort. A sensitivity of 80% and a specificity of 71% were found in SHOUT scores to identify patients with broad discharge failure with AUC of 0.83 (95% CI 0.83 to 0.84). When applied to a 3-day restricted discharge failure model, a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 60% were found to identify patients with AUC of 0.79 (95% CI 0.78 to 0.80).
CONCLUSION: The SHOUT scoring system was derived and used to screen and identify patients that would ultimately become discharge failures, especially when using broad definitions of discharge failure. The SHOUT tool was internally validated and can be used to identify patients across a wide spectrum of discharge failure definitions.

PMID: 31248927 [PubMed - in process]

Identifying diverse concepts of discharge failure patients at emergency department in the USA: a large-scale retrospective observational study.

James d'Etienne, MD - Thu, 07/04/2019 - 21:46
Related Articles

Identifying diverse concepts of discharge failure patients at emergency department in the USA: a large-scale retrospective observational study.

BMJ Open. 2019 Jun 27;9(6):e028051

Authors: Schrader CD, Robinson RD, Blair S, Shaikh S, d'Etienne JP, Kirby JJ, Cheeti R, Zenarosa NR, Wang H

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Identifying patients who are at high risk for discharge failure allows for implementation of interventions to improve their care. However, discharge failure is currently defined in literature with great variability, making targeted interventions more difficult. We aim to derive a screening tool based on the existing diverse discharge failure models.
DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: This is a single-centre retrospective cohort study in the USA. Data from all patients discharged from the emergency department were collected from 1 January 2015 through 31 December 2017 and followed up within 30 days.
METHODS: Scoring systems were derived using modified Framingham methods. Sensitivity, specificity and area under the receiver operational characteristic (AUC) were calculated and compared using both the broad and restricted discharge failure models.
RESULTS: A total of 227 627 patients were included. The Screening for Healthcare fOllow-Up Tool (SHOUT) scoring system was derived based on the broad and restricted discharge failure models and applied back to the entire study cohort. A sensitivity of 80% and a specificity of 71% were found in SHOUT scores to identify patients with broad discharge failure with AUC of 0.83 (95% CI 0.83 to 0.84). When applied to a 3-day restricted discharge failure model, a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 60% were found to identify patients with AUC of 0.79 (95% CI 0.78 to 0.80).
CONCLUSION: The SHOUT scoring system was derived and used to screen and identify patients that would ultimately become discharge failures, especially when using broad definitions of discharge failure. The SHOUT tool was internally validated and can be used to identify patients across a wide spectrum of discharge failure definitions.

PMID: 31248927 [PubMed - in process]

Identifying diverse concepts of discharge failure patients at emergency department in the USA: a large-scale retrospective observational study.

Hao Wang, MD - Thu, 07/04/2019 - 21:46
Related Articles

Identifying diverse concepts of discharge failure patients at emergency department in the USA: a large-scale retrospective observational study.

BMJ Open. 2019 Jun 27;9(6):e028051

Authors: Schrader CD, Robinson RD, Blair S, Shaikh S, d'Etienne JP, Kirby JJ, Cheeti R, Zenarosa NR, Wang H

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Identifying patients who are at high risk for discharge failure allows for implementation of interventions to improve their care. However, discharge failure is currently defined in literature with great variability, making targeted interventions more difficult. We aim to derive a screening tool based on the existing diverse discharge failure models.
DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: This is a single-centre retrospective cohort study in the USA. Data from all patients discharged from the emergency department were collected from 1 January 2015 through 31 December 2017 and followed up within 30 days.
METHODS: Scoring systems were derived using modified Framingham methods. Sensitivity, specificity and area under the receiver operational characteristic (AUC) were calculated and compared using both the broad and restricted discharge failure models.
RESULTS: A total of 227 627 patients were included. The Screening for Healthcare fOllow-Up Tool (SHOUT) scoring system was derived based on the broad and restricted discharge failure models and applied back to the entire study cohort. A sensitivity of 80% and a specificity of 71% were found in SHOUT scores to identify patients with broad discharge failure with AUC of 0.83 (95% CI 0.83 to 0.84). When applied to a 3-day restricted discharge failure model, a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 60% were found to identify patients with AUC of 0.79 (95% CI 0.78 to 0.80).
CONCLUSION: The SHOUT scoring system was derived and used to screen and identify patients that would ultimately become discharge failures, especially when using broad definitions of discharge failure. The SHOUT tool was internally validated and can be used to identify patients across a wide spectrum of discharge failure definitions.

PMID: 31248927 [PubMed - in process]

Identifying diverse concepts of discharge failure patients at emergency department in the USA: a large-scale retrospective observational study.

Chet Schrader, MD - Thu, 07/04/2019 - 21:46
Related Articles

Identifying diverse concepts of discharge failure patients at emergency department in the USA: a large-scale retrospective observational study.

BMJ Open. 2019 Jun 27;9(6):e028051

Authors: Schrader CD, Robinson RD, Blair S, Shaikh S, d'Etienne JP, Kirby JJ, Cheeti R, Zenarosa NR, Wang H

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Identifying patients who are at high risk for discharge failure allows for implementation of interventions to improve their care. However, discharge failure is currently defined in literature with great variability, making targeted interventions more difficult. We aim to derive a screening tool based on the existing diverse discharge failure models.
DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: This is a single-centre retrospective cohort study in the USA. Data from all patients discharged from the emergency department were collected from 1 January 2015 through 31 December 2017 and followed up within 30 days.
METHODS: Scoring systems were derived using modified Framingham methods. Sensitivity, specificity and area under the receiver operational characteristic (AUC) were calculated and compared using both the broad and restricted discharge failure models.
RESULTS: A total of 227 627 patients were included. The Screening for Healthcare fOllow-Up Tool (SHOUT) scoring system was derived based on the broad and restricted discharge failure models and applied back to the entire study cohort. A sensitivity of 80% and a specificity of 71% were found in SHOUT scores to identify patients with broad discharge failure with AUC of 0.83 (95% CI 0.83 to 0.84). When applied to a 3-day restricted discharge failure model, a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 60% were found to identify patients with AUC of 0.79 (95% CI 0.78 to 0.80).
CONCLUSION: The SHOUT scoring system was derived and used to screen and identify patients that would ultimately become discharge failures, especially when using broad definitions of discharge failure. The SHOUT tool was internally validated and can be used to identify patients across a wide spectrum of discharge failure definitions.

PMID: 31248927 [PubMed - in process]

Making Sense of Family Medicine Resident Wellness Curricula: A Delphi Study of Content Experts.

Making Sense of Family Medicine Resident Wellness Curricula: A Delphi Study of Content Experts.

Fam Med. 2019 Jul 02;:

Authors: Penwell-Waines L, Runyan C, Kolobova I, Grace A, Brennan J, Buck K, Ross V, Schneiderhan J

Abstract
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The Association of Family Medicine Residency Directors (AFMRD) Physician Wellness Task Force released a comprehensive Well-Being Action Plan as a guide to help programs create a culture of wellness. The plan, however, does not offer a recommendation as to which elements may be most important, least resource intensive, or most feasible. This study sought to identify the most essential components of the AFMRD's Well-Being Action Plan, as rated by expert panelists using a modified Delphi technique.
METHODS: Sixty-eight selected experts were asked to participate; after three rounds of surveys, the final sample included 27 participants (7% residents, 38% MD faculty, 54% behavioral science faculty).
RESULTS: Fourteen elements were rated as essential by at least 80% of the participants. These components included interventions at both the system and individual level. Of those elements ranked in the top five by a majority of the panel, all but one do not mention specific curricular content, but rather discusses the nature of a wellness curriculum.
CONCLUSIONS: The expert consensus was that an essential curriculum should begin early, be longitudinal, identify a champion, and provide support for self-disclosure of struggles.

PMID: 31269221 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Family Physician Burnout and Resilience: A Cross-Sectional Analysis.

Family Physician Burnout and Resilience: A Cross-Sectional Analysis.

Fam Med. 2019 Jul 02;:

Authors: Buck K, Williamson M, Ogbeide S, Norberg B

Abstract
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Current physician burnout levels are at historically high levels, especially in family medicine, with many factors playing a role. The goal of this study was to understand demographic, psychological, environmental, behavioral, and workplace characteristics that impact physician wellness and burnout, focusing on family medicine physicians and residents.
METHODS: Survey respondents were 295 family medicine residents and faculty members across 11 residency programs within the Residency Research Network of Texas (RRNeT). Subjects completed multiple measures to assess resilience, burnout, psychological flexibility, and workplace stress. Respondents also reported personal wellness practices and demographic information. The primary outcome variables were burnout (depersonalization, emotional exhaustion, and personal achievement) and resilience.
RESULTS: The predictor variables contributed significant variance (depersonalization=27.1%, emotional exhaustion=39%, accomplishment=37.7%, resilience=37%) and resulted in large effect sizes (depersonalization f²=.371, emotional exhaustion f²=.639, accomplishment f²=.605, resilience f²=.587) among the three burnout models and the resilience model for the sample. Similar variance and effect sizes were present for independent resident and program faculty samples, with resilience being the only outcome variable with significant differences in variance between the samples.
CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates the roles of both individual and organization change needed to impact provider wellness, with special attention to resilience across faculty and residents. The results of this study may inform workplace policies (ie, organizational practice change) and wellness programming and curricula (ie, individual level) for family medicine residents and program faculty.

PMID: 31269220 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Identifying diverse concepts of discharge failure patients at emergency department in the USA: a large-scale retrospective observational study.

Related Articles

Identifying diverse concepts of discharge failure patients at emergency department in the USA: a large-scale retrospective observational study.

BMJ Open. 2019 Jun 27;9(6):e028051

Authors: Schrader CD, Robinson RD, Blair S, Shaikh S, d'Etienne JP, Kirby JJ, Cheeti R, Zenarosa NR, Wang H

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Identifying patients who are at high risk for discharge failure allows for implementation of interventions to improve their care. However, discharge failure is currently defined in literature with great variability, making targeted interventions more difficult. We aim to derive a screening tool based on the existing diverse discharge failure models.
DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: This is a single-centre retrospective cohort study in the USA. Data from all patients discharged from the emergency department were collected from 1 January 2015 through 31 December 2017 and followed up within 30 days.
METHODS: Scoring systems were derived using modified Framingham methods. Sensitivity, specificity and area under the receiver operational characteristic (AUC) were calculated and compared using both the broad and restricted discharge failure models.
RESULTS: A total of 227 627 patients were included. The Screening for Healthcare fOllow-Up Tool (SHOUT) scoring system was derived based on the broad and restricted discharge failure models and applied back to the entire study cohort. A sensitivity of 80% and a specificity of 71% were found in SHOUT scores to identify patients with broad discharge failure with AUC of 0.83 (95% CI 0.83 to 0.84). When applied to a 3-day restricted discharge failure model, a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 60% were found to identify patients with AUC of 0.79 (95% CI 0.78 to 0.80).
CONCLUSION: The SHOUT scoring system was derived and used to screen and identify patients that would ultimately become discharge failures, especially when using broad definitions of discharge failure. The SHOUT tool was internally validated and can be used to identify patients across a wide spectrum of discharge failure definitions.

PMID: 31248927 [PubMed - in process]

Association Between Empathy and Burnout Among Emergency Medicine Physicians.

Hao Wang, MD - Thu, 06/27/2019 - 19:58
Related Articles

Association Between Empathy and Burnout Among Emergency Medicine Physicians.

J Clin Med Res. 2019 Jul;11(7):532-538

Authors: Wolfshohl JA, Bradley K, Bell C, Bell S, Hodges C, Knowles H, Chaudhari BR, Kirby R, Kline JA, Wang H

Abstract
Background: The association between physician self-reported empathy and burnout has been studied in the past with diverse findings. We aimed to determine the association between empathy and burnout among United States emergency medicine (EM) physicians using a novel combination of tools for validation.
Methods: This was a prospective single-center observational study. Data were collected from EM physicians. From December 1, 2018 to January 31, 2019, we used the Jefferson scale of empathy (JSE) to assess physician empathy and the Copenhagen burnout inventory (CBI) to assess burnout. We divided EM physicians into different groups (residents in each year of training, junior/senior attendings). Empathy, burnout scores and their association were analyzed and compared among these groups.
Results: A total of 33 attending physicians and 35 EM residents participated in this study. Median self-reported empathy scores were 113 (interquartile range (IQR): 105 - 117) in post-graduate year (PGY)-1, 112 (90 - 115) in PGY-2, 106 (93 - 118) in PGY-3 EM residents, 112 (105 - 116) in junior and 114 (101 - 125) in senior attending physicians. Overall burnout scores were 43 (33 - 50) in PGY-1, 51 (29 - 56) in PGY-2, 43 (42 - 53) in PGY-3 EM residents, 33 (24 - 47) in junior attending and 25 (22 - 53) in senior attending physicians separately. The Spearman correlation (ρ) was -0.11 and β-weight was -0.23 between empathy and patient-related burnout scores.
Conclusion: Self-reported empathy declines over the course of EM residency training and improves after graduation. Overall high burnout occurs among EM residents and improves after graduation. Our analysis showed a weak negative correlation between self-reported empathy and patient-related burnout among EM physicians.

PMID: 31236173 [PubMed]

Initiation of the ABCD3-I algorithm for expediated evaluation of transient ischemic attack patients in an emergency department.

Hao Wang, MD - Thu, 06/27/2019 - 19:58
Related Articles

Initiation of the ABCD3-I algorithm for expediated evaluation of transient ischemic attack patients in an emergency department.

Am J Emerg Med. 2019 Jun 10;:

Authors: Dahlquist RT, Young JM, Reyner K, Farzad A, Moleno RB, Gandham G, Ho AF, Wang H

Abstract
BACKGROUND: The use of ABCD3-I score for Transient ischemic attack (TIA) evaluation has not been widely investigated in the ED. We aim to determine the performance and cost-effectiveness of an ABCD3-I based pathway for expedited evaluation of TIA patients in the ED.
METHODS: We conducted a single-center, pre- and post-intervention study among ED patients with possible TIA. Accrual occurred for seven months before (Oct. 2016-April 2017) and after (Oct. 2017-April 2018) implementing the ABCD3-I algorithm with a five-month wash-in period (May-Sept. 2017). Total ED length of stay (LOS), admissions to the hospital, healthcare cost, and 90-day ED returns with subsequent stroke were analyzed and compared.
RESULTS: Pre-implementation and post-implementation cohorts included 143 and 118 patients respectively. A total of 132 (92%) patients were admitted to the hospital in the pre-implementation cohort in comparison to 28 (24%) patients admitted in the post-implementation cohort (p < 0.001) with similar 90-day post-discharge stroke occurrence (2 in pre-implementation versus 1 in post-implementation groups, p > 0.05). The mean ABCD2 scores were 4.5 (1.4) in pre- and 4.1 (1.3) in post-implementation cohorts (p = 0.01). The mean ABCD3-I scores were 4.5 (1.8) in post-implementation cohorts. Total ED LOS was 310 min (201, 420) in pre- and 275 min (222, 342) in post-implementation cohorts (p > 0.05). Utilization of the ABCD3-I algorithm saved an average of over 40% of total healthcare cost per patient in the post-implementation cohort.
CONCLUSIONS: The initiation of an ABCD3-I based pathway for TIA evaluation in the ED significantly decreased hospital admissions and cost with similar 90-day neurological outcomes.

PMID: 31230922 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Association Between Empathy and Burnout Among Emergency Medicine Physicians.

Related Articles

Association Between Empathy and Burnout Among Emergency Medicine Physicians.

J Clin Med Res. 2019 Jul;11(7):532-538

Authors: Wolfshohl JA, Bradley K, Bell C, Bell S, Hodges C, Knowles H, Chaudhari BR, Kirby R, Kline JA, Wang H

Abstract
Background: The association between physician self-reported empathy and burnout has been studied in the past with diverse findings. We aimed to determine the association between empathy and burnout among United States emergency medicine (EM) physicians using a novel combination of tools for validation.
Methods: This was a prospective single-center observational study. Data were collected from EM physicians. From December 1, 2018 to January 31, 2019, we used the Jefferson scale of empathy (JSE) to assess physician empathy and the Copenhagen burnout inventory (CBI) to assess burnout. We divided EM physicians into different groups (residents in each year of training, junior/senior attendings). Empathy, burnout scores and their association were analyzed and compared among these groups.
Results: A total of 33 attending physicians and 35 EM residents participated in this study. Median self-reported empathy scores were 113 (interquartile range (IQR): 105 - 117) in post-graduate year (PGY)-1, 112 (90 - 115) in PGY-2, 106 (93 - 118) in PGY-3 EM residents, 112 (105 - 116) in junior and 114 (101 - 125) in senior attending physicians. Overall burnout scores were 43 (33 - 50) in PGY-1, 51 (29 - 56) in PGY-2, 43 (42 - 53) in PGY-3 EM residents, 33 (24 - 47) in junior attending and 25 (22 - 53) in senior attending physicians separately. The Spearman correlation (ρ) was -0.11 and β-weight was -0.23 between empathy and patient-related burnout scores.
Conclusion: Self-reported empathy declines over the course of EM residency training and improves after graduation. Overall high burnout occurs among EM residents and improves after graduation. Our analysis showed a weak negative correlation between self-reported empathy and patient-related burnout among EM physicians.

PMID: 31236173 [PubMed]

Initiation of the ABCD3-I algorithm for expediated evaluation of transient ischemic attack patients in an emergency department.

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Initiation of the ABCD3-I algorithm for expediated evaluation of transient ischemic attack patients in an emergency department.

Am J Emerg Med. 2019 Jun 10;:

Authors: Dahlquist RT, Young JM, Reyner K, Farzad A, Moleno RB, Gandham G, Ho AF, Wang H

Abstract
BACKGROUND: The use of ABCD3-I score for Transient ischemic attack (TIA) evaluation has not been widely investigated in the ED. We aim to determine the performance and cost-effectiveness of an ABCD3-I based pathway for expedited evaluation of TIA patients in the ED.
METHODS: We conducted a single-center, pre- and post-intervention study among ED patients with possible TIA. Accrual occurred for seven months before (Oct. 2016-April 2017) and after (Oct. 2017-April 2018) implementing the ABCD3-I algorithm with a five-month wash-in period (May-Sept. 2017). Total ED length of stay (LOS), admissions to the hospital, healthcare cost, and 90-day ED returns with subsequent stroke were analyzed and compared.
RESULTS: Pre-implementation and post-implementation cohorts included 143 and 118 patients respectively. A total of 132 (92%) patients were admitted to the hospital in the pre-implementation cohort in comparison to 28 (24%) patients admitted in the post-implementation cohort (p < 0.001) with similar 90-day post-discharge stroke occurrence (2 in pre-implementation versus 1 in post-implementation groups, p > 0.05). The mean ABCD2 scores were 4.5 (1.4) in pre- and 4.1 (1.3) in post-implementation cohorts (p = 0.01). The mean ABCD3-I scores were 4.5 (1.8) in post-implementation cohorts. Total ED LOS was 310 min (201, 420) in pre- and 275 min (222, 342) in post-implementation cohorts (p > 0.05). Utilization of the ABCD3-I algorithm saved an average of over 40% of total healthcare cost per patient in the post-implementation cohort.
CONCLUSIONS: The initiation of an ABCD3-I based pathway for TIA evaluation in the ED significantly decreased hospital admissions and cost with similar 90-day neurological outcomes.

PMID: 31230922 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Where Are the Opportunities for Reducing Health Care Spending Within Alternative Payment Models?

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Where Are the Opportunities for Reducing Health Care Spending Within Alternative Payment Models?

J Oncol Pract. 2018 06;14(6):e375-e383

Authors: Rocque GB, Williams CP, Kenzik KM, Jackson BE, Halilova KI, Sullivan MM, Rocconi RP, Azuero A, Kvale EA, Huh WK, Partridge EE, Pisu M

Abstract
PURPOSE: The Oncology Care Model (OCM) is a highly controversial specialty care model developed by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid aimed to provide higher-quality care at lower cost. Because oncologists will be increasingly held accountable for spending as well as quality within new value-based health care models like the OCM, they need to understand the drivers of total spending for their patients.
METHODS: This retrospective cohort study included patients ≥ 65 years of age with primary fee-for-service Medicare insurance who received antineoplastic therapy at 12 cancer centers in the Southeast from 2012 to 2014. Medicare administrative claims data were used to identify health care spending during the prechemotherapy period (from cancer diagnosis to antineoplastic therapy initiation) and during the OCM episodes of care triggered by antineoplastic treatment. Total health care spending per episode includes all types of services received by a patient, including nononcology services. Spending was further characterized by type of service.
RESULTS: Average total health care spending in the three OCM episodes of care was $33,838 (n = 3,427), $23,811 (n = 1,207), and $19,241 (n = 678). Antineoplastic drugs accounted for 27%, 32%, and 36% of total health care spending in the first, second, and third episodes. Ten drugs, used by 31% of patients, contributed 61% to drug spending ($18.8 million) in the first episode. Inpatient spending also substantially contributed to total costs, representing 17% to 20% ($30.5 million) of total health care spending.
CONCLUSION: Health care spending was heavily driven by both antineoplastic drugs and hospital use. Oncologists' ability to affect these types of spending will determine their success under alternative payment models.

PMID: 28981388 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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