Search this website

Feed aggregator

The Radiographic Prepatellar Fat Thickness Ratio Correlates With Infection Risk After Total Knee Arthroplasty.

Hugo Sanchez, MD - 6 hours 2 min ago
Related Articles

The Radiographic Prepatellar Fat Thickness Ratio Correlates With Infection Risk After Total Knee Arthroplasty.

J Arthroplasty. 2018 07;33(7):2251-2255

Authors: Wagner RA, Hogan SP, Burge JR, Bates CM, Sanchez HB

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Obesity has been associated with complications after a total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Surgical site infection (SSI) after TKA is one of the feared complications as it increases revision rates, costs, and stress to the patient. There is conflicting evidence in the literature regarding body mass index (BMI) and risk of infection after TKA, and some studies have suggested that site-specific fat distribution may be a better metric for determining risk of postoperative infections. Here, we investigate the correlation of soft tissue distribution about the knee to SSI after TKA.
METHODS: We retrospectively review 572 patients who underwent primary TKA at a single institution from 2006 to 2010. We introduce the prepatellar fat thickness ratio (PFTR) as a radiographic means to quantitatively assess fat distribution about the knee and evaluate this measurement's ability to assess the risk of developing an SSI after TKA.
RESULTS: The PFTR was shown to be a better predictor of SSI than BMI in both the univariate (P = .05) and multivariate (P = .01) analyses.
CONCLUSION: Although BMI cannot fully account for variations in adipose distribution, the PFTR may account for this variability and may be a helpful tool for assessing a patient's preoperative risk of SSI after TKA.

PMID: 29555491 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

The Radiographic Prepatellar Fat Thickness Ratio Correlates With Infection Risk After Total Knee Arthroplasty.

Related Articles

The Radiographic Prepatellar Fat Thickness Ratio Correlates With Infection Risk After Total Knee Arthroplasty.

J Arthroplasty. 2018 07;33(7):2251-2255

Authors: Wagner RA, Hogan SP, Burge JR, Bates CM, Sanchez HB

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Obesity has been associated with complications after a total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Surgical site infection (SSI) after TKA is one of the feared complications as it increases revision rates, costs, and stress to the patient. There is conflicting evidence in the literature regarding body mass index (BMI) and risk of infection after TKA, and some studies have suggested that site-specific fat distribution may be a better metric for determining risk of postoperative infections. Here, we investigate the correlation of soft tissue distribution about the knee to SSI after TKA.
METHODS: We retrospectively review 572 patients who underwent primary TKA at a single institution from 2006 to 2010. We introduce the prepatellar fat thickness ratio (PFTR) as a radiographic means to quantitatively assess fat distribution about the knee and evaluate this measurement's ability to assess the risk of developing an SSI after TKA.
RESULTS: The PFTR was shown to be a better predictor of SSI than BMI in both the univariate (P = .05) and multivariate (P = .01) analyses.
CONCLUSION: Although BMI cannot fully account for variations in adipose distribution, the PFTR may account for this variability and may be a helpful tool for assessing a patient's preoperative risk of SSI after TKA.

PMID: 29555491 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

HEART Score Risk Stratification of Low-Risk Chest Pain Patients in the Emergency Department: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Richard Robinson, MD - Wed, 02/06/2019 - 09:11
Related Articles

HEART Score Risk Stratification of Low-Risk Chest Pain Patients in the Emergency Department: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Ann Emerg Med. 2019 Feb 01;:

Authors: Laureano-Phillips J, Robinson RD, Aryal S, Blair S, Wilson D, Boyd K, Schrader CD, Zenarosa NR, Wang H

Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVE: The objectives of this systematic review and meta-analysis are to appraise the evidence in regard to the diagnostic accuracy of a low-risk History, ECG, Age, Risk Factors, and Troponin (HEART) score for prediction of major adverse cardiac events in emergency department (ED) patients. These included 4 subgroup analyses: by geographic region, the use of a modified low-risk HEART score (traditional HEART score [0 to 3] in addition to negative troponin results), using conventional versus high-sensitivity troponin assays in the HEART score, and a comparison of different post-ED-discharge patient follow-up intervals.
METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, EBSCO, Web of Science, and Cochrane Database for studies on the diagnostic performance of low-risk HEART scores to predict major adverse cardiac events among ED chest pain patients. Two reviewers independently screened articles for inclusion, assessed the quality of studies with both an adapted Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies version 2 tool and an internally developed tool that combined components of the Quality in Prognostic Studies; Checklist for Critical Appraisal and Data Extraction for Systematic Reviews of Prediction Modelling Studies; and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation. Pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and positive and negative likelihood ratios were calculated.
RESULTS: There were 25 studies published from 2010 to 2017, with a total of 25,266 patients included in the final meta-analysis, of whom 9,919 (39.3%) were deemed to have low-risk HEART scores (0 to 3). Among patients with low-risk HEART scores, short-term major adverse cardiac events (30 days to 6 weeks) occurred in 2.1% of the population (182/8,832) compared with 21.9% of patients (3,290/15,038) with non-low-risk HEART scores (4 to 10). For patients with HEART scores of 0 to 3, the pooled sensitivity of short-term major adverse cardiac event predictions was 0.96 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.93 to 0.98), specificity was 0.42 (95% CI 0.36 to 0.49), positive predictive value was 0.19 (95% CI 0.14 to 0.24), negative predictive value was 0.99 (95% CI 0.98 to 0.99), positive likelihood ratio was 1.66 (95% CI 1.50 to 1.85), and negative likelihood ratio was 0.09 (95% CI 0.06 to 0.15). Subgroup analysis showed that lower short-term major adverse cardiac events occurred among North American patients (0.7%), occurred when modified low-risk HEART score was used (0.8%), or occurred when high-sensitivity troponin was used for low-risk HEART score calculations (0.8%).
CONCLUSION: In this meta-analysis, despite its use in different patient populations, the troponin type used, and timeline of follow-up, a low-risk HEART score had high sensitivity, negative predictive value, and negative likelihood ratio for predicting short-term major adverse cardiac events, although risk of bias and statistical heterogeneity were high.

PMID: 30718010 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

HEART Score Risk Stratification of Low-Risk Chest Pain Patients in the Emergency Department: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Hao Wang, MD - Wed, 02/06/2019 - 09:11
Related Articles

HEART Score Risk Stratification of Low-Risk Chest Pain Patients in the Emergency Department: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Ann Emerg Med. 2019 Feb 01;:

Authors: Laureano-Phillips J, Robinson RD, Aryal S, Blair S, Wilson D, Boyd K, Schrader CD, Zenarosa NR, Wang H

Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVE: The objectives of this systematic review and meta-analysis are to appraise the evidence in regard to the diagnostic accuracy of a low-risk History, ECG, Age, Risk Factors, and Troponin (HEART) score for prediction of major adverse cardiac events in emergency department (ED) patients. These included 4 subgroup analyses: by geographic region, the use of a modified low-risk HEART score (traditional HEART score [0 to 3] in addition to negative troponin results), using conventional versus high-sensitivity troponin assays in the HEART score, and a comparison of different post-ED-discharge patient follow-up intervals.
METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, EBSCO, Web of Science, and Cochrane Database for studies on the diagnostic performance of low-risk HEART scores to predict major adverse cardiac events among ED chest pain patients. Two reviewers independently screened articles for inclusion, assessed the quality of studies with both an adapted Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies version 2 tool and an internally developed tool that combined components of the Quality in Prognostic Studies; Checklist for Critical Appraisal and Data Extraction for Systematic Reviews of Prediction Modelling Studies; and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation. Pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and positive and negative likelihood ratios were calculated.
RESULTS: There were 25 studies published from 2010 to 2017, with a total of 25,266 patients included in the final meta-analysis, of whom 9,919 (39.3%) were deemed to have low-risk HEART scores (0 to 3). Among patients with low-risk HEART scores, short-term major adverse cardiac events (30 days to 6 weeks) occurred in 2.1% of the population (182/8,832) compared with 21.9% of patients (3,290/15,038) with non-low-risk HEART scores (4 to 10). For patients with HEART scores of 0 to 3, the pooled sensitivity of short-term major adverse cardiac event predictions was 0.96 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.93 to 0.98), specificity was 0.42 (95% CI 0.36 to 0.49), positive predictive value was 0.19 (95% CI 0.14 to 0.24), negative predictive value was 0.99 (95% CI 0.98 to 0.99), positive likelihood ratio was 1.66 (95% CI 1.50 to 1.85), and negative likelihood ratio was 0.09 (95% CI 0.06 to 0.15). Subgroup analysis showed that lower short-term major adverse cardiac events occurred among North American patients (0.7%), occurred when modified low-risk HEART score was used (0.8%), or occurred when high-sensitivity troponin was used for low-risk HEART score calculations (0.8%).
CONCLUSION: In this meta-analysis, despite its use in different patient populations, the troponin type used, and timeline of follow-up, a low-risk HEART score had high sensitivity, negative predictive value, and negative likelihood ratio for predicting short-term major adverse cardiac events, although risk of bias and statistical heterogeneity were high.

PMID: 30718010 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

HEART Score Risk Stratification of Low-Risk Chest Pain Patients in the Emergency Department: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Chet Schrader, MD - Wed, 02/06/2019 - 09:11
Related Articles

HEART Score Risk Stratification of Low-Risk Chest Pain Patients in the Emergency Department: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Ann Emerg Med. 2019 Feb 01;:

Authors: Laureano-Phillips J, Robinson RD, Aryal S, Blair S, Wilson D, Boyd K, Schrader CD, Zenarosa NR, Wang H

Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVE: The objectives of this systematic review and meta-analysis are to appraise the evidence in regard to the diagnostic accuracy of a low-risk History, ECG, Age, Risk Factors, and Troponin (HEART) score for prediction of major adverse cardiac events in emergency department (ED) patients. These included 4 subgroup analyses: by geographic region, the use of a modified low-risk HEART score (traditional HEART score [0 to 3] in addition to negative troponin results), using conventional versus high-sensitivity troponin assays in the HEART score, and a comparison of different post-ED-discharge patient follow-up intervals.
METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, EBSCO, Web of Science, and Cochrane Database for studies on the diagnostic performance of low-risk HEART scores to predict major adverse cardiac events among ED chest pain patients. Two reviewers independently screened articles for inclusion, assessed the quality of studies with both an adapted Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies version 2 tool and an internally developed tool that combined components of the Quality in Prognostic Studies; Checklist for Critical Appraisal and Data Extraction for Systematic Reviews of Prediction Modelling Studies; and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation. Pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and positive and negative likelihood ratios were calculated.
RESULTS: There were 25 studies published from 2010 to 2017, with a total of 25,266 patients included in the final meta-analysis, of whom 9,919 (39.3%) were deemed to have low-risk HEART scores (0 to 3). Among patients with low-risk HEART scores, short-term major adverse cardiac events (30 days to 6 weeks) occurred in 2.1% of the population (182/8,832) compared with 21.9% of patients (3,290/15,038) with non-low-risk HEART scores (4 to 10). For patients with HEART scores of 0 to 3, the pooled sensitivity of short-term major adverse cardiac event predictions was 0.96 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.93 to 0.98), specificity was 0.42 (95% CI 0.36 to 0.49), positive predictive value was 0.19 (95% CI 0.14 to 0.24), negative predictive value was 0.99 (95% CI 0.98 to 0.99), positive likelihood ratio was 1.66 (95% CI 1.50 to 1.85), and negative likelihood ratio was 0.09 (95% CI 0.06 to 0.15). Subgroup analysis showed that lower short-term major adverse cardiac events occurred among North American patients (0.7%), occurred when modified low-risk HEART score was used (0.8%), or occurred when high-sensitivity troponin was used for low-risk HEART score calculations (0.8%).
CONCLUSION: In this meta-analysis, despite its use in different patient populations, the troponin type used, and timeline of follow-up, a low-risk HEART score had high sensitivity, negative predictive value, and negative likelihood ratio for predicting short-term major adverse cardiac events, although risk of bias and statistical heterogeneity were high.

PMID: 30718010 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Addressing Mental Health Needs among Physicians.

Katherine Buck, PhD - Wed, 02/06/2019 - 09:11

Addressing Mental Health Needs among Physicians.

South Med J. 2019 Feb;112(2):67-69

Authors: Buck K, Grace A, Runyan T, Brown-Berchtold L

PMID: 30708367 [PubMed - in process]

HEART Score Risk Stratification of Low-Risk Chest Pain Patients in the Emergency Department: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Related Articles

HEART Score Risk Stratification of Low-Risk Chest Pain Patients in the Emergency Department: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Ann Emerg Med. 2019 Feb 01;:

Authors: Laureano-Phillips J, Robinson RD, Aryal S, Blair S, Wilson D, Boyd K, Schrader CD, Zenarosa NR, Wang H

Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVE: The objectives of this systematic review and meta-analysis are to appraise the evidence in regard to the diagnostic accuracy of a low-risk History, ECG, Age, Risk Factors, and Troponin (HEART) score for prediction of major adverse cardiac events in emergency department (ED) patients. These included 4 subgroup analyses: by geographic region, the use of a modified low-risk HEART score (traditional HEART score [0 to 3] in addition to negative troponin results), using conventional versus high-sensitivity troponin assays in the HEART score, and a comparison of different post-ED-discharge patient follow-up intervals.
METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, EBSCO, Web of Science, and Cochrane Database for studies on the diagnostic performance of low-risk HEART scores to predict major adverse cardiac events among ED chest pain patients. Two reviewers independently screened articles for inclusion, assessed the quality of studies with both an adapted Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies version 2 tool and an internally developed tool that combined components of the Quality in Prognostic Studies; Checklist for Critical Appraisal and Data Extraction for Systematic Reviews of Prediction Modelling Studies; and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation. Pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and positive and negative likelihood ratios were calculated.
RESULTS: There were 25 studies published from 2010 to 2017, with a total of 25,266 patients included in the final meta-analysis, of whom 9,919 (39.3%) were deemed to have low-risk HEART scores (0 to 3). Among patients with low-risk HEART scores, short-term major adverse cardiac events (30 days to 6 weeks) occurred in 2.1% of the population (182/8,832) compared with 21.9% of patients (3,290/15,038) with non-low-risk HEART scores (4 to 10). For patients with HEART scores of 0 to 3, the pooled sensitivity of short-term major adverse cardiac event predictions was 0.96 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.93 to 0.98), specificity was 0.42 (95% CI 0.36 to 0.49), positive predictive value was 0.19 (95% CI 0.14 to 0.24), negative predictive value was 0.99 (95% CI 0.98 to 0.99), positive likelihood ratio was 1.66 (95% CI 1.50 to 1.85), and negative likelihood ratio was 0.09 (95% CI 0.06 to 0.15). Subgroup analysis showed that lower short-term major adverse cardiac events occurred among North American patients (0.7%), occurred when modified low-risk HEART score was used (0.8%), or occurred when high-sensitivity troponin was used for low-risk HEART score calculations (0.8%).
CONCLUSION: In this meta-analysis, despite its use in different patient populations, the troponin type used, and timeline of follow-up, a low-risk HEART score had high sensitivity, negative predictive value, and negative likelihood ratio for predicting short-term major adverse cardiac events, although risk of bias and statistical heterogeneity were high.

PMID: 30718010 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Improving perceptions of empathy in patients undergoing low-yield computerized tomographic imaging in the emergency department.

Related Articles

Improving perceptions of empathy in patients undergoing low-yield computerized tomographic imaging in the emergency department.

Patient Educ Couns. 2018 04;101(4):717-722

Authors: Lin MP, Probst MA, Puskarich MA, Dehon E, Kuehl DR, Wang RC, Hess EP, Butler K, Runyon MS, Wang H, Courtney DM, Muckley B, Hobgood CD, Hall CL, Kline JA

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: We assessed emergency department (ED) patient perceptions of how physicians can improve their language to determine patient preferences for 11 phrases to enhance physician empathy toward the goal of reducing low-value advanced imaging.
METHODS: Multi-center survey study of low-risk ED patients undergoing computerized tomography (CT) scanning.
RESULTS: We enroled 305 participants across nine sites. The statement "I have carefully considered what you told me about what brought you here today" was most frequently rated as important (88%). The statement "I have thought about the cost of your medical care to you today" was least frequently rated as important (59%). Participants preferred statements indicating physicians had considered their "vital signs and physical examination" (86%), "past medical history" (84%), and "what prior research tells me about your condition" (79%). Participants also valued statements conveying risks of testing, including potential kidney injury (78%) and radiation (77%).
CONCLUSION: The majority of phrases were identified as important. Participants preferred statements conveying cognitive reassurance, medical knowledge and risks of testing.
PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Our findings suggest specific phrases have the potential to enhance ED patient perceptions of physician empathy. Further research is needed to determine whether statements to convey empathy affect diagnostic testing rates.

PMID: 29173841 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Addressing Mental Health Needs among Physicians.

Addressing Mental Health Needs among Physicians.

South Med J. 2019 Feb;112(2):67-69

Authors: Buck K, Grace A, Runyan T, Brown-Berchtold L

PMID: 30708367 [PubMed - in process]

Geriatric Trauma Patients With Cervical Spine Fractures due to Ground Level Fall: Five Years Experience in a Level One Trauma Center.

Veer Vithalani, MD - Wed, 01/30/2019 - 08:39
Related Articles

Geriatric Trauma Patients With Cervical Spine Fractures due to Ground Level Fall: Five Years Experience in a Level One Trauma Center.

J Clin Med Res. 2013 Apr;5(2):75-83

Authors: Wang H, Coppola M, Robinson RD, Scribner JT, Vithalani V, de Moor CE, Gandhi RR, Burton M, Delaney KA

Abstract
BACKGROUND: It has been found that significantly different clinical outcomes occur in trauma patients with different mechanisms of injury. Ground level falls (GLF) are usually considered "minor trauma" with less injury occurred in general. However, it is not uncommon that geriatric trauma patients sustain cervical spine (C-spine) fractures with other associated injuries due to GLF or less. The aim of this study is to determine the injury patterns and the roles of clinical risk factors in these geriatric trauma patients.
METHODS: Data were reviewed from the institutional trauma registry of our local level 1 trauma center. All patients had sustained C-spine fracture(s). Basic clinical characteristics, the distribution of C-spine fracture(s), and mechanism of injury in geriatric patients (65 years or older) were compared with those less than 65 years old. Furthermore, different clinical variables including age, gender, Glasgow coma scale (GCS), blood alcohol level, and co-existing injuries were analyzed by multivariate logistic regression in geriatric trauma patients due to GLF and internally validated by random bootstrapping technique.
RESULTS: From 2006 - 2010, a total of 12,805 trauma patients were included in trauma registry, of which 726 (5.67%) had sustained C-spine fracture(s). Among all C-spine fracture patients, 19.15% (139/726) were geriatric patients. Of these geriatric patients 27.34% (38/139) and 53.96% (75/139) had C1 and C2 fractures compared with 13.63% (80/587) and 21.98% (129/587) in young trauma patients (P < 0.001). Of geriatric trauma patients 13.67% (19/139) and 18.71% (26/139) had C6 and C7 fractures compared with 32.03% (188/587) and 41.40% (243/587) in younger ones separately (P < 0.001). Furthermore, 53.96% (75/139) geriatric patients had sustained C-spine fractures due to GLF with more upper C-spine fractures (C1 and C2). Only 3.2% of those had positive blood alcohol levels compared with 52.9% of younger patients (P < 0.001). In addition, 6.34% of geriatric patients due to GLF had intracranial pathology (ICP) which was one of the most common co-injuries with C-spine fractures. Logistic regression analysis showed the adjusted odds ratios of 1.17 (age) and 91.57 (male) in geriatric GLF patients to predict this co-injury pattern of C-spine fracture and ICP.
CONCLUSION: Geriatric patients tend to sustain more upper C-spine fractures than non-geriatric patients regardless of the mechanisms. GLF or less not only can cause isolated C-spines fracture(s) but also lead to other significant injuries with ICP as the most common one in geriatric patients. Advanced age and male are two risk factors that can predict this co-injury pattern. In addition, it seems that alcohol plays no role in the cause of GLF in geriatric trauma patients.

PMID: 23519239 [PubMed]

Clinical Outcomes for Diabetic Foot Ulcers Treated with Clostridial Collagenase Ointment or with a Product Containing Silver.

Travis Motley, DPM - Wed, 01/30/2019 - 08:38
Related Articles

Clinical Outcomes for Diabetic Foot Ulcers Treated with Clostridial Collagenase Ointment or with a Product Containing Silver.

Adv Wound Care (New Rochelle). 2018 Oct 01;7(10):339-348

Authors: Motley TA, Caporusso JM, Lange DL, Eichelkraut RA, Cargill DI, Dickerson JE

Abstract
Objective: To compare outcomes of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) treated with clostridial collagenase ointment (CCO) or silver-containing products, both in combination with sharp debridement as needed. Approach: One hundred two subjects with qualifying DFUs were randomized to daily treatment with either CCO or a silver-containing product for 6 weeks followed by a 4 -week follow-up period. The primary outcome was the mean percent reduction in DFU area. A secondary outcome was the incidence of ulcer infections between groups. Results: At the end of treatment, the mean percent reduction in area from baseline of DFUs treated with CCO was 62% (p < 0.0001) and with silver was 40% (p < 0.0001). The difference between groups-22%-was not statistically significant (p = 0.071). Among ulcers closed by the end of treatment, the mean time to closure was 31.1 ± 9.0 days versus 37.1 ± 7.7 days, respectively (not statistically significant). There was a numerically greater incidence of target ulcer infections in the silver group (11, 21.6%) than in the CCO group (5, 9.8%; p = 0.208). No clinically relevant safety signals were identified in either group. Innovation: CCO treatment can progress a wound toward closure. Ulcer infection prophylaxis may not be sacrificed when treating DFU with CCO in lieu of silver-containing products. Conclusion: Both CCO and silver-containing products promote significant reduction in DFU area over 6 weeks of treatment with no clinically relevant safety concerns. Mean percent reduction in lesion area was numerically (22%) but not significantly greater with CCO compared to silver, as was time to ulcer closure, with an incidence of ulcer infection at least as low as for silver-containing products.

PMID: 30374419 [PubMed]

Transitioning From a Level II to Level I Trauma Center Increases Resident Patient Exposure.

Timothy Niacaris, MD - Wed, 01/30/2019 - 08:38
Related Articles

Transitioning From a Level II to Level I Trauma Center Increases Resident Patient Exposure.

J Foot Ankle Surg. 2017 Nov - Dec;56(6):1170-1172

Authors: Carpenter B, Levine L, Niacaris T, Suzuki S

Abstract
Increased patient exposure has been shown to improve residency training as determined by better patient outcomes. The transition of John Peter Smith Hospital from a level II to a level I trauma center in 2009 provided a unique opportunity to investigate the direct effects of increased patient exposure on residency training in a relatively controlled setting. We evaluated the effect of the transition to a level I trauma center on residency training. In 2014, we examined the annual facility reports and separated the data into 2 groups: level II (2001 to 2008) and level I (2010 to 2013). The primary outcome measures were patient volume, surgical volume, patient acuity, and scholarly activity by the residents. The patient volume in all units increased significantly (p < .05 for all) after the transition to a level I center. The surgical volume increased significantly for the general surgery, orthopedics, and podiatry departments (p < .05 for all) but remained unchanged in the gynecology and oral maxillofacial surgery departments. The volume measures were performed on all 98 residents (100%). Patient acuity and scholarly activity increased by 17% and 52%, respectively; however, the differences in these data were not statistically significant. The scholarly activity per resident was measured for the orthopedic and podiatry departments. For those departments, the total number of residents was 30, and scholarly activity was measured for 100% of them. Overall, resident education improved when the hospital transitioned to a level I trauma center, although certain subspecialties benefited more than did others from this transition.

PMID: 28888403 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Midcarpal Instability: A Comprehensive Review and Update.

Timothy Niacaris, MD - Wed, 01/30/2019 - 08:38
Related Articles

Midcarpal Instability: A Comprehensive Review and Update.

Hand Clin. 2015 Aug;31(3):487-93

Authors: Niacaris T, Ming BW, Lichtman DM

Abstract
Midcarpal instability has been well described as a clinical entity but the pathokinematics and pathologic anatomy continue to be poorly understood. This article presents a comprehensive review of the existing knowledge and literature-based evidence for the diagnosis and management of the various entities comprising midcarpal instability. It discusses the limitations of the current understanding of midcarpal instability and proposes new directions for furthering knowledge of the causes and treatment of midcarpal instability and wrist pathomechanics in general.

PMID: 26205710 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Surgical Techniques for the Management of Midcarpal Instability.

Timothy Niacaris, MD - Wed, 01/30/2019 - 08:38
Related Articles

Surgical Techniques for the Management of Midcarpal Instability.

J Wrist Surg. 2014 Aug;3(3):171-4

Authors: Ming BW, Niacaris T, Lichtman DM

Abstract
Palmar midcarpal instability (PMCI) is an uncommon and poorly understood disorder. Its etiology is believed to be due to traumatic or congenital laxity of the ligaments (volar and dorsal) that stabilize the proximal row. This laxity results in hypermobility of the proximal carpal row and unphysiologic coupling of the midcarpal joint. Clinically, the condition is manifested by a painful clunk with ulnar and radial wrist deviation. The purpose of this article is to chronicle our personal experience with this condition and to review our current treatment recommendations and outcomes.

PMID: 27054049 [PubMed]

Role of ED crowding relative to trauma quality care in a Level 1 Trauma Center.

Stefan Buca, MD - Wed, 01/30/2019 - 08:37
Related Articles

Role of ED crowding relative to trauma quality care in a Level 1 Trauma Center.

Am J Emerg Med. 2018 Jun 18;:

Authors: Singh N, Robinson RD, Duane TM, Kirby JJ, Lyell C, Buca S, Gandhi R, Mann SM, Zenarosa NR, Wang H

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Trauma Quality Improvement Program participation among all trauma centers has shown to improve patient outcomes. We aim to identify trauma quality events occurring during the Emergency Department (ED) phase of care.
METHODS: This is a single-center observational study using consecutively registered data in local trauma registry (Jan 1, 2016-Jun 30, 2017). Four ED crowding scores as determined by four different crowding estimation tools were assigned to each enrolled patient upon arrival to the ED. Patient related (age, gender, race, severity of illness, ED disposition), system related (crowding, night shift, ED LOS), and provider related risk factors were analyzed in a multivariate logistic regression model to determine associations relative to ED quality events.
RESULTS: Total 5160 cases were enrolled among which, 605 cases were deemed ED quality improvement (QI) cases and 457 cases were ED provider related. Similar percentages of ED QI cases (10-12%) occurred across the ED crowding status range. No significant difference was appreciated in terms of predictability of ED QI cases relative to different crowding status after adjustment for potential confounders. However, an adjusted odds ratio of 1.64 (95% CI, 1.17-2.30, p < 0.01) regarding ED LOS ≥2 h predictive of ED related quality issues was noted when analyzed using multivariate logistic regression.
CONCLUSION: Provider related issues are a common contributor to undesirable outcomes in trauma care. ED crowding lacks significant association with poor trauma quality care. Prolonged ED LOS (≥2 h) appears to be linked with unfavorable outcomes in ED trauma care.

PMID: 30139579 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

A Derivation and Validation Study of an Early Blood Transfusion Needs Score for Severe Trauma Patients.

Stefan Buca, MD - Wed, 01/30/2019 - 08:37
Related Articles

A Derivation and Validation Study of an Early Blood Transfusion Needs Score for Severe Trauma Patients.

J Clin Med Res. 2016 Aug;8(8):591-7

Authors: Wang H, Umejiego J, Robinson RD, Schrader CD, Leuck J, Barra M, Buca S, Shedd A, Bui A, Zenarosa NR

Abstract
BACKGROUND: There is no existing adequate blood transfusion needs determination tool that Emergency Medical Services (EMS) personnel can use for prehospital blood transfusion initiation. In this study, a simple and pragmatic prehospital blood transfusion needs scoring system was derived and validated.
METHODS: Local trauma registry data were reviewed retrospectively from 2004 through 2013. Patients were randomly assigned to derivation and validation cohorts. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify the independent approachable risks associated with early blood transfusion needs in the derivation cohort in which a scoring system was derived. Sensitivity, specificity, and area under the receiver operational characteristic (AUC) were calculated and compared using both the derivation and validation data.
RESULTS: A total of 24,303 patients were included with 12,151 patients in the derivation and 12,152 patients in the validation cohorts. Age, penetrating injury, heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and Glasgow coma scale (GCS) were risks predictive of early blood transfusion needs. An early blood transfusion needs score was derived. A score > 5 indicated risk of early blood transfusion need with a sensitivity of 83% and a specificity of 80%. A sensitivity of 82% and a specificity of 80% were also found in the validation study and their AUC showed no statistically significant difference (AUC of the derivation = 0.87 versus AUC of the validation = 0.86, P > 0.05).
CONCLUSIONS: An early blood transfusion scoring system was derived and internally validated to predict severe trauma patients requiring blood transfusion during prehospital or initial emergency department resuscitation.

PMID: 27429680 [PubMed]

Predictors of mortality among initially stable adult pelvic trauma patients in the US: Data analysis from the National Trauma Data Bank.

Stefan Buca, MD - Wed, 01/30/2019 - 08:37
Related Articles

Predictors of mortality among initially stable adult pelvic trauma patients in the US: Data analysis from the National Trauma Data Bank.

Injury. 2015 Nov;46(11):2113-7

Authors: Wang H, Phillips JL, Robinson RD, Duane TM, Buca S, Campbell-Furtick MB, Jennings A, Miller T, Zenarosa NR, Delaney KA

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Pelvic fractures are associated with increased risk of death among trauma patients. Studies show independent risks predicting mortality among patients with pelvic fractures vary across different geographic regions. This study analyses national data to determine predictors of mortality in initially stable adult pelvic trauma patients in the US.
METHODS: This study is a retrospective analysis of the US National Trauma Data Bank from January 2003 to December 2010 among trauma patients ≥18 years of age with pelvic fractures (including acetabulum). Over 150 variables were reviewed and analysed. The primary outcome was all-cause in-hospital mortality. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine independent risk factors predictive of in-hospital mortality in stable pelvic fracture patients.
RESULTS: 30,800 patients were included in the final analysis. Overall in-hospital mortality rate was 2.7%. Mortality increased twofold in middle aged patients (age 55-70), and increased nearly fourfold in patients with advanced age ≥70. We found patients with advanced age, higher severity of injury, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) <8, GCS between 9 and 12, prolonged mechanical ventilation, and/or in-hospital blood product administration experienced higher mortality. Patients transported to level 1 or level 2 trauma centres experienced lower mortality while concomitantly experiencing higher associated internal injuries.
CONCLUSIONS: Geriatric and middle aged pelvic fracture patients experience higher mortality. Predictors of mortality in initially stable pelvic fracture patients are advanced age, injury severity, mental status, prolonged mechanical ventilation, and/or in-hospital blood product administration. These patients might benefit from transport to local level 1 or level 2 trauma centres.

PMID: 26377773 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

A twisting of points: recognize the signs of Torsades de Pointes.

Stefan Buca, MD - Wed, 01/30/2019 - 08:37
Related Articles

A twisting of points: recognize the signs of Torsades de Pointes.

JEMS. 2011 Jul;36(7):40, 44

Authors: Buca S, McKinney J, Brywczynski J, Slovis C

PMID: 21807276 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Chest pain · shortness of breath · fever and nausea · Dx?

Smita Subramaniam, MD - Wed, 01/30/2019 - 08:37
Related Articles

Chest pain · shortness of breath · fever and nausea · Dx?

J Fam Pract. 2015 May;64(5):282-4

Authors: Manov A, Gopalakrishnan PP, Subramaniam S, Wardi M, White J

PMID: 26009736 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Lack of energy, petechiae, elevated PSA level--Dx?

Smita Subramaniam, MD - Wed, 01/30/2019 - 08:37
Related Articles

Lack of energy, petechiae, elevated PSA level--Dx?

J Fam Pract. 2014 Oct;63(10):565-7

Authors: Subramaniam S, Choufani E, Manov A

PMID: 25343154 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Pages